HK activist abducted (1)

The recent abduction case/claim in Hong Kong has taken an interesting turn: The HK police arrested the man, and seem to be accusing him of fabricating the incident. (But why would he do that? The whole case is unclear. There is of course no dearth of evidence on torture and mistreatment of people abducted by the Chinese authorities, on the mainland. Fabricating some, in HK, would seem to serve only to sow doubt about such matters, including about the recent several abductions from HK. So the possibility that generating such doubts itself is the purpose, should probably not be discounted. ). See too: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-40932772 –Magnus Fiskesjö, nf42@cornell.edu

Source: Hong Kong Free Press (8/16/17)
Democrat ‘abduction’: Police consider formally charging activist Howard Lam with misleading officers
By Kris Cheng

Acting Police Commissioner Alan Lau. Photo: RTHK screenshot.

Acting Police Commissioner Alan Lau has said the police will consider charging Democratic Party member Howard Lam with misleading police officers.

Last Friday, Lam said he was abducted and assaulted by suspected mainland agents in Hong Kong. He claimed that he was falsely imprisoned, interrogated and assaulted by men who inserted 21 staples into his legs. Continue reading

Documentary about comfort women

List members might be interested to know that a documentary on Chinese comfort women opened in cinemas in China this week. This film is the project of a young director named Guo Ke 郭柯 who filmed his interviews with the survivors of comfort women for Japanese soldiers during WWII. Financial assistance was provided by a TV drama star who sought the support of TV and film celebrities in China, including director Feng Xiaogang 冯小刚, her husband Yuan Hong 袁弘, also a hot TV drama personality and other friends to help promote the film. The documentary shows the now elderly women plainly and let them speak for themselves. When Guo began the project, thirty of them were still alive. By the time the film was completed, only twenty two were left. That is why the film is titled Twenty Two. By now, when the film is ready to be shown, only eight were still living.

Lily Lee <l.lee@sydney.edu.au>

USC position

University of Southern California position
Assistant Professor of Contemporary Chinese Literature and Media Studies

The Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures (EALC) at the Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences at the University of Southern California (Los Angeles, California) invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor position in contemporary Chinese literature and media studies. We seek a candidate who will complement a geographically diverse faculty in the department and work well across departments. The successful candidate will teach courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, as well as contribute to our general education program.

Applicants must have a Ph.D. in a relevant area of Chinese studies by the start of the appointment and must demonstrate research and teaching excellence. To apply, please submit a curriculum vitae, a cover letter that includes a statement of research and teaching interests, a writing sample, and the names of three individuals from whom letters of recommendation may be solicited.  The deadline for receipt of all application materials, including letters, is October 20, 2017.

In order to be considered for this position, applicants are required to submit an electronic USC application; follow this job link or paste in a browser: https://usccareers.usc.edu/job/los-angeles/assistant-professor-of-contemporary-chinese-literature-and-media-studies/1209/5401229 . Questions can be addressed to ealcsearch@dornsife.usc.edu. Continue reading

SOAS Centre of Taiwan Studies project officer position

Dear colleagues,

The SOAS Centre of Taiwan Studies is currently hiring a project officer. Please see below for more details, and click on this link for the FULL job description document.

Feel free to forward to anyone whom you think might be interested.

Many thanks.Kind regards

How Wee Ng <hn15@soas.ac.uk>

Project Officer, Centre of Taiwan Studies

Vacancy Number 001334
Location London
Campus Russell Square
Post Class Support
Department / Centre Centre of Taiwan Studies
Contract Type Fixed Term
Closing date for applications 27 August 2017

Job Description

£28,585 – £30,856 pro rata per annum inclusive of London Allowance
Part time (14 hours per week – 0.4 FTE)
Fixed term contract (11 Months)
The role and its responsibilities: The postholder will play a critical role in providing administrative support for the various Centre of Taiwan Studies (CTS) Research and events Programmes, sponsored by Taiwan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Ministry of Education. Continue reading

Wolf Warriors 2 (1)

Source: China Film Insider (8/13/17)
Film Review: ‘Wolf Warriors II’
By Jonathan Landreth

The hottest movie in China this summer tells the story of a fallen elite Chinese commando set on avenging the capture of his lover. Half way around the world in a resource-rich, disease-riddled, and war-torn nation somewhere along Africa’s coast, Leng Feng, is the gunslinging superhuman hero in writer, director and star Wu Jing’s super-violent shoot-em-up action film “Wolf Warriors 2.” Continue reading

Teaching Global Community in an Age of Anti-Immigration

PODCAST: Teaching Global Community in An Age of Anti-Immigration, with Eileen Chengyin Chow

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/fairbank-center/teaching-global-community-in-an-age-of-anti-immigration-with-eileen-chow

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/teaching-global-community-in-age-anti-immigration-eileen/id1255938359?i=1000390848201&mt=2

What role is there for storytelling and roleplay in teaching about Chinatowns and Chinese diasporas?

The “Harvard on China” podcast talks to Eileen Chengyin Chow, Professor in Duke University’s Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies and Co-Director of Duke’s Story Lab, director of the Shewo Institute of Chinese Journalism at Shih Hsin University, and Harvard alum. She is the author of the forthcoming “Chinatown States of Mind,” as well as the co-translator with Carlos Rojas of Yu Hua’s two-volume novel “Brothers” and the co-editor of the “Oxford Handbook of Chinese Cinemas.”

The “Harvard on China” podcast is hosted by James Evans at Harvard’s Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies.

You can subscribe to the “Harvard on China” podcast on iTunes, or listen on Soundcloud, Stitcher, and other podcast apps.

Comparative Literature and World Literature 2.1

Dear colleagues,

I am happy to tell you that the latest issue of Comparative Literature & World Literature is now available to download at  www. cwliterature.org.

We welcome any feedback and comments, as well as submissions of articles and reviews from scholars in comparative literature and related fields.

Comparative Literature & World Literature Vol. 2, No. 1, 2017
http://www.cwliterature.org/uploadfile/2017/0808/20170808053308721.pdf

Articles:

1 Some Thoughts about ‘World Literature’ and the Literature Truly Needed / Andreas Weiland (Aachen University)
http://www.cwliterature.org/uploadfile/2017/0811/20170811092429210.pdf

51 De l’Exotisme à la Mondialité : Problématique sur la Relation dans la Littérature Française / Yaqin WU (Paris-Sorbonne University)
http://www.cwliterature.org/uploadfile/2017/0808/20170808060514589.pdf

Continue reading

HK activist abducted

See the BBC article online, for pictures of the staples inserted into Mr Lam’s legs. (Also see: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/11/world/asia/hong-kong-democracy-activist-attack-china-.html). The identity of his assailants is unknown but it fits the general pattern of the well-known mainland police-hired thug enforcers who operate in civilian clothes to harrass people, close down events, beat up journalists, and so on. Fwd by: Magnus Fiskesjö <nf42@cornell.edu>

Source: BBC News (8/11/17)
Hong Kong activist ‘abducted by Chinese agents’
By Juliana Liu, Hong Kong correspondent, BBC News

Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Howard Lam (L), who claims he was abducted, blindfolded and beaten by mainland China agents, shows his stapled thighs and injuries to the media in Hong Kong on 11 August 2017. Image copyright AFP.

A veteran democracy activist in Hong Kong says he was kidnapped, beaten and tortured by agents of mainland China after trying to get in touch with Liu Xia, the widow of Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo.

The activist, Howard Lam, said on his Facebook page in late July that he had obtained a signed photo of the Barcelona football player Lionel Messi, and that he intended to send it to Ms Liu as a condolence gift. Continue reading

Reportage special issue for MCLC–cfp reminder

Dear colleagues,

This is a friendly reminder that the abstract for the MCLC special issue “Reportage and Its Contemporary Variations” is due by August 31. Please send abstracts of 500 words by August 31, 2017 to both guest editors, Charles Laughlin (cal5m@virginia.edu) and Li Guo (li.guo@usu.edu), and the general editor, Kirk A. Denton (denton.2@osu.edu). Selected abstracts will be invited to submit full manuscripts (30-50 pages, double-spaced) by May 15, 2018 for consideration of inclusion in the special issue for Modern Chinese Literature and Culture in Fall 2019.

https://u.osu.edu/mclc/2017/06/17/contemporary-reportage-at-work-special-mclc-issue-cfp/

Li Guo <li.guo@usu.edu>

Le Moulin

Posted by Bert Scruggs <bms@uci.edu>
Source: Japan Times (8/9/17)
‘Le Moulin’ gives a voice to Taiwanese poets who wrote under Japan’s colonial rule
by Kaori Shoji

Documenting a different time: Filmmaker Huang Ya-li uses archival footage and interviews in his film ‘Le Moulin’ to tell the story of a group of Taiwanese poets who lived under Japanese rule in the lead-up to World War II.

The word “nisshiki” (Japanese style) can often be seen on storefront signs in Taiwan to indicate chic, high-end products. It’s a little similar to what we in Japan associate with luxury items from France, though “nisshiki” is a holdover from the days when Taiwan was under Japanese rule (1895-1945).

Documentary filmmaker Huang Ya-li tells me that Taiwan is currently in the throes of a “Japan nostalgia boom” that recalls the colonial days with a degree of fondness he doesn’t quite understand. Continue reading

Notre Dame position

Assistant Professor in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture — University of Notre Dame

The University of Notre Dame Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures invites applications for the position of assistant professor in modern (including contemporary) Chinese literature and culture, beginning August 2018. Preference will be given to candidates who can offer courses on modern literature, film, and/or popular culture. Responsibilities include teaching two undergraduate courses per semester, one of which may be a Chinese language class at the 4th Year or Advanced level, depending on program needs. Active programmatic involvement and close collaboration with our faculty to advance the Chinese language and culture program are also expected.

As an international Catholic, research university, the University of Notre Dame has made a significant commitment to furthering Asian studies, as evidenced in the founding of the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies and the opening of a new graduate School of Global Affairs, both of which are in network with our growing department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. Information about Notre Dame is available at http://www.nd.edu; information about the Program of Chinese Language and Culture and the Department can be found athttp://eastasian.nd.edu. Inquiries about the search may be directed to Professor Xiaoshan Yang, chair of the search committee, at xyang@nd.edu. Continue reading

Journal of Modern Literature in Chinese 14.1

Journal of Modern Literature in Chinese has just released its Volume 14 Number 1.

The Table of Contents of our latest issue is below:

  • Homeless in the World: War, Narrative, and Historical Consciousness in Eileen Chang, György Lukács, and Lev Tolstoy. By Roy Bing Chan.
  • Old Tales, Untold: Lu Xun against World Literature. By Daniel M. Dooghan.
  • Translation in Distraction: On Eileen Chang’s “Chinese Translation: A Vehicle of Cultural Influence”. By Christopher Lee.
  • The Rise and Fall (and Rise Again) of Vernacular Happiness. By Haiyan Lee.
  • The Migrant Voice: The Politics of Writing Home between the Sinophone and Anglophone Worlds. Kenny K.K. Ng.
  • A Critical Review of Japanese Scholarship on Modern Chinese Fiction and Translation Studies. By César Guarde-Paz.
  • The Translated Identities of Chinese Minority Writers: Sinophone Naxi Authors. By Duncan Poupard.

Our website — http://www.ln.edu.hk/jmlc/

Posted by: Chris Song chrissong@LN.edu.hk

Chinoperl 36.1

CHINOPERL: Journal of Chinese Oral and Performing Literature No. 36.1 (July 2017)
Special Issue: Chinese Opera, Xiqu, and New Media, 1890s-1950s
Edited by XU Peng and Margaret Wan

To access abstracts and download the essays, link here: http://tandfonline.com/toc/ychi20/current

INTRODUCTION by XU PENG

ARTICLES

Hearing the Opera: “Teahouse Mimesis” and the Aesthetics of Noise in Early Jingju Recordings, 1890s-1910s XU PENG

Qi Rushan, Gewu (Song-and-Dance), and a History of Contemporary Peking Opera in Early Twentieth-Century China HSIAO-CHUN WU

Locating Theatricality on Stage and Screen: Rescuing Performance Practice and the Phenomenon of Fifteen Strings of Cash (Shiwu guan, 1956) ANNE REBULL Continue reading

Middlebury position

Middlebury College Assistant Professor of Chinese Position

Assistant Professor of Chinese, Middlebury College, MIDDLEBURY, VT — The Middlebury College Greenberg-Starr Department of Chinese Language and Literature invites applicants for a full-time tenure track position in Chinese literary and/or cultural studies (any historical period, any discipline) and Chinese language beginning fall 2018. The successful candidate will have a Ph.D. in hand or expected by August 2018, native or near-native proficiency in both Mandarin and English, and will teach, depending on the department’s needs and the qualifications of the candidate: 1) Chinese language courses at one or more levels from beginning to advanced, including courses on Chinese literature and culture taught in Chinese, and Classical Chinese; 2) courses on Chinese literature in translation; 3) courses taught in English on Chinese culture (e.g., film and television, popular culture, performance and visual art, print and material culture, internet culture, non-Han minority literature, global Sinophone literature and culture, etc.); 4) first year seminars; 5) College-wide courses such as introduction to world literature. The successful candidate will be able to innovate in the design and teaching of courses in Chinese literature and culture, dedicated to creative, effective, student-centered instruction, and enthusiastic about participation in a department with a tradition of team-work and commitment to high quality undergraduate education. Candidates should provide evidence of commitment to excellent teaching and scholarly potential. Continue reading