Ohio 4-H and Kentucky Kingdom & Hurricane Bay Exclusive Offer

We’re excited to announce that Ohio 4-H has partnered with Kentucky Kingdom & Hurricane Bay to offer exclusive discounts on ticket packages for you, your friends and family to enjoy!

Celebrate the return of summer with a discount that’s sure to thrill! Get Two Parks. Two Days + Free Fountain Drinks, all for 19.95! And with over 70 rides and attractions spread across 64 acres of beautifully landscaped gardens and pathways, there’s something for everyone to enjoy!

Buying ticket packages could not be easier. Simply navigate to https://www.kentuckykingdom.com/partners/ohio4-h to access the Discount Ticketing Portal. Here you can purchase discount ticket package vouchers for you, your family and friends – right from the comfort of your home!

Ohio Teens Take on Health at the National Youth Summit on Healthy Living

What do you get when you combine teams of teens, plus a heaping teaspoon of health, with a dash of DC? The 2017 National Youth Summit on Healthy Living!

Thanks to the Ohio 4-H Foundation’s investment in the Ohio 4-H Health Heroes, a 14-member delegation participated in this national opportunity along with teens from 26 states. This is the third year Ohio has had a team attend the summit.

The four days in February were packed with workshops, leading activities, participating in action planning sessions and sightseeing in our nation’s capital.

The best part, according to Rory Smith from Medina County was “meeting a ton of people, and even though they are from different states, we could share ideas together.” That sentiment was echoed by George Rak, also from Medina County, who added, “There are people from all over the country who are all working toward the same goal.”

The Ohio teens were involved in teaching three sessions of Water First for Thirst, a program created by Carol Smathers, FCS Field Specialist, and Theresa Ferrari, 4-H Extension Specialist. They also assisted Kelly Coble, 4-H Educator, Allen County with the Cutting Board Challenge.

This year’s delegation made some ambitious plans for what to do back in Ohio. They created, presented, and submitted three action plans for projects they would undertake in 2017.

·         4th H for Health Challenge

·         The Face of Addiction: The Face in the Mirror…Could Be You

·         Expanding County-Level Health Heroes Programs – Columbiana County

After attending a session of the 4th H for Health Challenge at the Summit, teens wanted to bring this challenge back to Ohio, according to Molly Hunt from Darke County. It brings health down to the club level because clubs will be challenged to include several healthy practices at their meetings: (1) drink water, (2) provide a healthy snack, (3) add 15 minutes of physical activity, and (4) include an activity that focuses on social and emotional wellness. Participating clubs and counties with the greatest percentage of involvement will receive recognition at next year’s Ohio 4-H Conference.

The Face of Addiction: The Face in the Mirror…Could Be You responds to Ohio’s opioid crisis. “The most surprising thing that I learned was actually that our own state was #1 in terms of drug overdose deaths. It really made me want to do something to change that,” said Rak. For this project, teens will create displays featuring a medicine cabinet that can be taken to clubs, fairs, and other events to educate about the drug epidemic and how to safely dispose of medications. “What most people don’t realize,” Ferrari said, “is that prescription opioids found in medicine cabinets in many homes can be the unintentional starting point of drug addiction.”

Another goal the group has is to expand the concept of healthy living advocates to the county-level. Kylie Cline, 4-H member from Columbiana County, and Columbiana County 4-H Educator Nicole Miller have taken on that project.

All three plans were funded with $500 mini-grants with funding provided to National 4-H Council from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Another highlight of the trip was getting to visit some of the museums, memorials, and monuments on the National Mall. The group visited the National Archives, Museum of Natural History, and American History Museum, as well as using the metro, bus, and walking to get around. Sunday’s night tour included the Lincoln Memorial; the Korean, Vietnam, and World War II memorials; and the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial. The unseasonably warm weather was a bonus, especially on the night tour, which incorporated more walking than typical for February.

All three plans were funded with $500 mini-grants with funding provided to National 4-H Council from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

A highlight of the trip was getting to visit some of the museums, memorials, and monuments on the National Mall. The group visited the National Archives, Museum of Natural History, and American History Museum, as well as using the metro, bus, and walking to get around. Sunday’s night tour included the Lincoln Memorial; the Korean, Vietnam, and World War II memorials and the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial. The unseasonably warm weather was a bonus, especially on the night tour, which incorporated more walking than typical for February.

This dedicated group of teens is working hard to “make the best better” to bring the Fourth H to the forefront in Ohio. Stay tuned for future updates on their projects.

 

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4-H Cultivates Healthy Eating Fanatics

The fourth H in 4-H stands for Health and we pledge our Health to better living. Healthy Living is also one of the mission mandates of 4-H, with nutrition and fitness as two of the core areas that 4-H programs strive to address. On Saturday March 6, thanks to an Ohio 4-H Foundation Grant, and utilizing the Eastern Brown High School food lab, a group of 16 4-H’ers in Brown County did just that at the C.H.E.F. Day Camp. C.H.E.F. (Cultivating Healthy Eating Fanatics) provides a hands-on experience in the kitchen.

Though food and nutrition was the focus of the day, the day started by discussing the importance of physical activity and reducing our stress. Theresa Ferrari, an OSU Extension Specialist for Healthy Living with the Ohio 4-H program, opened the discussion on physical activity and then led the youth on a short 4-H yoga routine.

The rest of the morning was spent covering safe food handling, nutrition guidelines, budgeting, and meal planning. Youth were split into small groups and charged with planning a menu for the day including breakfast, lunch, dinner and a snack with two requirements: meeting the MyPlate guidelines set by USDA and using a budget of $30 for a family of four. Christi Rockey, 4-H Volunteer and OSF Foods Department Superintendent, covered portion sizes using measurements, but also how to estimate portion sizes with your hands. “Teaching them to judge portion sizes with their hands gives them a tool they can use anywhere” said Rockey. “Most restaurant portions are easily three to four times what is recommended.”

After menus were planned, groups then had to select lunch or dinner to cook. They were given a meal budget of $15, a Kroger sales ad, and a list of provided pantry items to further aid in planning their meal. Following lunch and an overview of what to look for in the grocery store, participants boarded a bus and went to Kroger. Upon arrival, manager Brent Wilson met with the youth, who were armed with their shopping lists, and gave them a quick introduction to the store and Kroger in general.

Participants then shopped in small groups to gather all the supplies they needed. After checking out and being over budget, 14-year-old Caitlyn Wills said “I learned how to read a label; you have to look at the total price, not just per pound.” Wills’ team had to regroup and adjust their menu to a different cut of meat to reduce their budget. Another group quickly learned the importance of using their store loyalty card; they went from being $6 over budget, to under budget, after a visit to the customer service desk.

Before leaving Kroger, Wilson met with the group again to ask about their experience. Not to miss an opportunity, Wilson also told them to remember that when they turn 16 he is hiring. When asked what skills he was looking for in employees, Wilson said “A smile; I can teach other things, but I can’t teach you to smile.”

Upon returning to the school, the group covered proper table settings and watched a video on knife skills. The highlight of the day followed with the C.H.E.F. cooking showdown. Participants were given 45 minutes to cook their meals. Menus included chicken salad with pasta and alfredo sauce, rosemary pork chops with asparagus and pickled peppers, chicken cordon bacon, and several variations on fruit smoothies. Jarrett Ingle, 15, was a part of the group who attempted pork chops. Ingle said, “I learned I have to work on my time management, my pork chops weren’t done on time. I also learned to make sure I am clear at the meat counter when ordering, these were bigger than I thought!”

After cooking was, of course, the chance to sample all the great dishes. Groups received feedback about taste, presentation, portion size, and adherence to MyPlate recommendations. Ferrari told the youth they could cook for her anytime. The participants were challenged to try foods from other groups, even if they didn’t think they would like the options. Ferrari said, “Sometimes you don’t know if you like something until you try it, and part of getting kids to eat healthy is exposing them to different foods.”

After sampling, the participants got a crash course in Dishes 101 before cleaning up the kitchen. Rockey said, “You eat, you clean!” Parents were starting to arrive as this lesson was taking place, and laughed as they said now they can’t claim they don’t know how to do dishes.

At the end of the day, all the participants were asked to share about their experience. Cayden Wills, 9, was most excited about the fact that he “learned how to use a knife.” One of the oldest participants shared, “I actually cooked something. I had never done anything more than microwave before.” All of the participants said they felt they could cook at least part of a meal in the future.

“Tying all of these skills together from planning a budget and good nutrition, success at the grocery and the reality of preparation and cleanup has become a lost art. C.H.E.F is a chance to acquire those Family and Consumer Science skills that these youth will need throughout their adulthood,” said Rockey.

C.H.E.F. was made possible by a grant from the Ohio 4-H Foundation, Brown County 4-H Committee, and Eastern Brown High School.

The 4-H program is part of the Ohio State University Extension services. For more information about the 4-H program and how to get involved, contact the Brown County OSU Extension office at 937-378-6716. You can also find more information at brown.osu.edu or follow Brown County 4-H on Facebook at facebook.com/brownco4h.

 

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Raise Your Hand, Ohio!

In 4-H, we believe in the power of America’s youth to succeed in life; however, only one in three kids say they have the skills they need to handle what life throws their way. That’s why 4-H created “Raise Your Hand.” A nationwide call to action for alumni to “raise their hands” to empower our nation’s youth with the skills to lead for a lifetime. Help us grow the next generation of True Leaders—because every child deserves the opportunity to succeed.

Are you a 4-H Grown Alum? Raise your hand to pay it forward at  www.4-H.org/RaiseYourHand

Raise Your Hand, it doesn’t cost a thing and the State with the most Alumni this spring will get $20,000 to use towards 4-H programming.

Questions? Contact the Ohio 4-H Foundation via e-mail at ohio4hfoundation.osu.edu

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4-H Sewing Project Assistance

Are you a 4-H member looking to get some help on your sewing project? The Women’s Club Quilters would be happy to help you.  They can help you with clothing, quilting, and home decor projects.

4-H members are expected to bring their own materials and sewing supplies, pattern or project book, sewing machine, matching thread and scissors and any special sewing feet you may need for their machine.

The group meets at the Marion Women’s Club and will help you on Thursday May 11 and 25 from the time school is out until 5:00 and all day on Thursday June 8, 2017.  Parents can drop the kids off or stay with them.

The Marion Women’s Club is at 1126 E. Center Street, Marion Ohio.

If you have any questions or if you plan to come, please call Karen at 740-386-2936 or 740-396-9340.