On MLK Day, remembering George Washington Carver

George Washington Carver

George Washington Carver (ca. 1860s – January 5, 1943). Photo taken by Frances Benjamin Johnston in 1906

Martin Luther King Day is a good time to reflect upon the contributions of George Washington Carver, a groundbreaking agricultural scientist, plant pathologist and inventor.  He was a pioneer in education, research, and agricultural extension.  He developed innovative uses for peanuts and other crops, and he promoted cultural practices such as  crop rotation.

Born into slavery, George Washington Carver overcame tremendous obstacles to become the first black graduate of Iowa State.  He would go onn to become a preeminent scientist and educator at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.

(this is a modifed repost from previous Martin Luther King holidays)

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The Little Plant Doctor: A Story About George Washington Carver (Holiday House)
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Norman Borlaug Statue in the U.S. Capitol

Norman Borlaug, plant pathologist, Father of the Green Revolution and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, was honored with a statue in the National Statuary Hall in the U.S. Capitol.  He’s also known as “the man who fed the world” for the development of high-yielding, disease-resistant wheat that vastly improved wheat production in Mexico, India and the U.S.

The statue of Borlaug, an Iowa native, was unveiled on March 25, 2014, what would have been his 100th birthday. The right side of the statue’s pedestal reads, “The Man Who Saved A Billion Lives.”

His legacy continues through several foundations that continue to provide education and research on crop improvement.

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Biography > National Statuary