How to tell if your plant is sick

by Stephanie Wuebben, Agriscience Education major

If you just planted some seedlings and they aren’t sprouting . . .

Check to see if the seeds are outdated, old seeds have poor germination. Look to see the depth requirement of the seed, you may have planted the seedling to deep or too shallow. Also see how compacted the soil is, this leads to not enough air and water reaching the seed. Temperature also greatly affects seed germination, if it is too hot it could lead to the soil drying out. If there is too much precipitation, the soil will retain too much water and thus be too wet.

If you notice the seed sprouting, but it isn’t growing as it should . . .

Check to make sure you planted the seed in the correct lighting, too much or too little sunlight leads to poor growth. If you notice that the leaves are “burnt” at the tips, review your fertilizer and pesticide use.

If you have a full-sized plant . . .

If you notice slow growth check your lighting again, see how compact the soil is, and make sure it is getting adequate water. If you notice the roots are surfacing, you may be over watering your plant. You want to check the leaves of your plant to see if there are any adverse leaf colorings.

If you would like further information visit the link below:

http://extension.psu.edu/pests/plant-diseases/all-fact-sheets/diagnosing-poor-plant-health

Hopefully these tips and tricks will help you discover diseases within your garden or fields and help you establish a healthy crop.

A little about myself:

My name is Stephanie Wuebben and I am a third year at The Ohio State University in Columbus. I transferred from Ohio State Agricultural Technical Institute in Wooster where I graduated with my Associate’s degree in Agriscience Education to Columbus to complete my Bachelor’s degree in the same area.

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This blog post was an assignment for Societal Issues: Pesticides, Alternatives and the Environment (PLNTPTH 4597). The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the class, Department of Plant Pathology or the instructor.

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