Pac-Man instead of eye patch

eyegame imageBy Emily Caldwell
Ohio State Research Communications

Scientists have created video games that add an important element of fun to the repetitive training needed to improve vision in people – including adults – with a lazy eye and poor depth perception.

The training tools, including a Pac-Man-style “cat and mouse” game and a “search for oddball” game, have produced results in pilot testing: Weak-eye vision improved to 20/20 and 20/50 in two adult research participants with lazy eyes whose vision was 20/25 and 20/63, respectively, before the training began.

Unlike the common use of eye patches on dominant eyes to make lazy eyes stronger, this type of testing uses a “push-pull” method by making both eyes work during the training. Patching is push-only training because the dominant eye remains completely unused.

With push-pull, both eyes are stimulated but with the weaker eye exposed to more complex images that create a stronger stimulus. In this way, both eyes are encouraged to interact as they should, but the dominant eye’s power in the relationship is suppressed. This technique targets important pathways in the brain that must be active to produce balanced vision.

Read more at Ohio State’s research news site >>

Ohio State surgeons use new device to treat cluster headaches

cluster-headache-device

For those suffering excruciating pain from cluster headaches, relief may soon be available from an investigational device being studied in a national multicenter clinical trial. Recently, doctors at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and the College of Dentistry performed the first surgery in the United States to insert a neurostimulator to provide relief from cluster headaches, which are more painful than migraines.

“Cluster headache is one of the most severe and disabling chronic pain conditions known to humankind. That’s why it’s important to look at options to help these patients,” said Dr. Ali Rezai, director of the Neuroscience program at Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center and one of the scientific developers of this technology.

Read more at the College of Dentistry website