About the Authors, Financial Counseling and Planning, V 9(2), 1998


Financial Counseling and Planning, Volume 9 (2),
1998

About the Authors


Steven G.
Aldana
, Validity and Reliability of a Financial Strain Instrument,
is an associate professor of health promotion in the College of Health
and Human Performance and is the Director of Health Promotion Programs
at Brigham Young University. He has an M.S. in exercise science and health
promotion from Brigham Young University and a Ph.D. in Exercise and Wellness
Education from Arizona State University. He is a nationally recognized
researcher and scholar in the areas of behavior change, health risk management,
health promotion cost-benefit and exercise science. In addition to his
grants and 44 research publications, he recently published his second textbook
entitled Step Up to Wellness: A Stage Based Approach. Currently,
he is a consultant for the National Cancer Institute and the National Institutes
of Health.

Tim
Christiansen
, Antecedents of Trust and Commitment in the Financial
Planner-Client Relationship,
is an Assistant Professor at Purdue University
in the Department of Consumer Science and Retailing. He received his Ph.D.
in marketing from Arizona State University. His primary research interests
are in the areas of retail management and marketing strategy. He has co-authored
articles in Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Journal of Consumer
Satisfaction/Dissatisfaction and Complaining Behavior and Journal of Professional
Services Marketing, as well as a number of papers presented at various
conferences.

Sharon
A. DeVaney,
Antecedents of Trust and Commitment in the Financial
Planner-Client Relationship,
is an Assistant Professor in Consumer
Sciences and Retailing and Faculty Associate in Gerontology at Purdue University.
She received a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University. She received a $75,000
grant from the AARP Andrus Foundation for her proposal entitled Financial
Preparation for Retirement: A Comparison of Self-Employed and Wage and
Salary Workers. Articles that she has authored or co-authored have been
selected for awards from the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards,
the journal of Financial Counseling and Planning, and the American
Collegiate Retailing Association. Her dissertation received an award from
the Ohio Family and Consumer Science Association. She is an Accredited
Financial Counselor.

Jean A. Hamilton,
Retirement Programs: Reaching Midlife Professional Women, is an
associate professor in the Textiles and Apparel Management department at
the University of Missouri-Columbia where she teaches a qualitative research
methods course. She received her Ph.D. from the same institution with a
supporting area of Cultural Anthropology. Her research primarily uses culture
as the unit of analysis and generally focuses on the relationship between
culture, human behavior, and dress. Her research work is exclusively qualitative.

Sherman
Hanna
,
The Spouse Effect on Participation And Investment Decisions
for Retirement Funds
, is a professor in the Consumer Sciences
Department at The Ohio State University. He received a Ph.D. in Consumer
Economics from Cornell University and a B.S. in Economics from the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology. In 1999 he received the Texas Instruments Award
for a paper with Yoonkyung Yuh and Catherine Montalto presented at the
1998 Academy of Financial Services meeting.

Charles B. Hatcher,
Regarding the Relationship Between Income and Wealth in Retirement,
is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Housing and Consumer Economics
at the University of Georgia. He received his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees
from Cornell University in 1993, 1995 and 1997, respectively. His doctoral
thesis was chosen by the American Council on Consumer Interests as the
best dissertation of 1997. His research focuses on the economics of the
retirement decision: how individuals decide how much they need in order
to retire, and how this hypothetical value changes with an individual’s
characteristics. His 1997 article A Model of Desired Wealth at Retirement
received a best journal article from the Association for Financial Counseling
and Planning Education.

Tahira K. Hira,
Predictors of Financial Satisfaction: Differences between Retirees and
Non-retirees
, is an associate vice provost for Extension and a professor
of Personal Finance and Consumer Economics at Iowa State University. Since
1976 she has taught and conducted research in family financial management,
consumer credit, gambling, and consumer bankruptcy in the US, Japan, UK,
Canada, and New Zealand.. She was invited as expert witness for U. S. Senate
Committee on Judiciary for revision of consumer bankruptcy code, and for
U. S. Senate Banking Committee on the topic of need or money management
education requirement for savings rates. In 1996, she received Association
of Financial Counseling and Planning’s Distinguished Fellows Award. She
is a Certified Financial Planner and has served on the Board of Standards
and Practices for the Certified Financial Planners. She was founding president
and several years later served a three year term as executive director
of the Association for Financial Counseling and Planning Education. She
has a Ph.D. from the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Jon
A. Hooks
, Mutual Fund Investment Discretion and the Asset Allocation
Problem
, is an Associate Professor of Economics and Finance in the
Economics Department at Albion College (Michigan). He received a Ph.D.
in Monetary and Financial Theory from Michigan State University in 1989.
He has published numerous articles on financial markets and investment
company products, and is the author of a textbook, Economics: Fundamentals
for Financial Services Providers
, published by the American Bankers
Association in 1998. He is a licensed broker, and has spent 9 years in
financial sales, bank brokerage operations, and financial planning. He
is a past Commissioner of the Jackson, Michigan Hospital Finance Authority,
and currently serves as a Trustee and Treasurer of the Albion, Michigan
Community Foundation.

Phyllis J. Johnson, The Impact of Financial Attitudes and
Knowledge on Financial Management and Satisfaction of Recently Married
Individuals
, is an Associate Professor in the School of Social Work
and Family Studies at the University of British Columbia. She has a Ph.D.
in Family Resource Management from The Ohio State University. She received
the Founders’ Invited Lectureship Award in 1994 from the Canadian Association
for Research in Home Economics. In 1998, she became a Faculty Fellow of
Green College, a center for advanced interdisciplinary scholarship at the
University of British Columbia. She is on the editorial board of the
Journal of Consumer Affairs
and the Canadian Home Economics Journal,
having
served as Research Editor for the latter. Her research emphasizes how a
variety of families allocate financial and human resources as they cope
with conflicts or adjust to changed circumstances. She recently completed
a 10-year longitudinal study of family, consumer, and employment patterns
of Vietnamese refugees.

Wendy Liljenquist, Validity and Reliability of a Financial
Strain Instrument
, received her M.S. degree from Brigham Young University
in Exercise Science with an emphasis in Health Promotion.  Her other
research interests include health during pregnancy and carbohydrate loading. 
She now resides in Virginia and does private health counseling.

Olive M. Mugenda, Predictors of Financial Satisfaction: Differences
between Retirees and Non-retirees
, is an Associate Professor in the
department of Family and Consumer Studies at Kenyatta University, Nairobi,
Kenya. She is also the Director of International Programs in the University.
In addition she is Africa Region Coordinator of Africa Education Research
Network
. She received M.S. and Ph.D degrees from Iowa State University
. Her area of interest is family and consumer economics and research methods. 
She teaches consumer education, resource management to graduate students
at Kenyatta University. Prof. Mugenda has also supervised over 30 thesis
and dissertations. She is a trainer in research methods and has trained
researchers in Kenya, Botswana and Uganda.  She has edited a book
on reconceptualizing Home Economics in Africa and co-authored two books
on Home Economics principles and practice. In addition she has authored
and co authored over 30 research articles focusing on quality of life,
consumer education, credit use and the role of research.

Jodi L. Parrotta, The Impact of Financial Attitudes and Knowledge
on Financial Management and Satisfaction of Recently Married Individuals
,
has a B.A. in Psychology, and received her M.A. in Family Studies from
the University of British Columbia in 1996 with emphasis in family financial
management. She has presented papers at several conferences including Canadian
Home Economics and Canadian Association for Research in Home Economics.
She has previously worked as a research assistant in the Commerce Department
at UBC. She is currently working for the Alberta Cancer Board as a research
assistant on the Physical Activity and Prostate Cancer Risk study.

Deanna L.
Sharpe
, Retirement Programs: Reaching Midlife Professional Women,
is an Assistant Professor in Consumer and Family Economics at the University
of Missouri-Columbia where she teaches courses on Personal and Family Management,
Social and Economic Trends, Employee Benefits and Retirement Planning and
Family Economics at the undergraduate and graduate level. She earned a
master’s degree in Economics and a Ph.D. in Family Resource Management
from Iowa State University and is a Certified Financial Planner. She is
an ad hoc reviewer for the Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal
and the Journal of Family and Economic Issues. Her current research
focuses on employee benefits of various occupational groups, retirement
planning of women, and economic well being of the aged.

Jaimie Sung,
The Spouse Effect on Participation And Investment Decisions for Retirement
Funds
, is a Post-Doctoral Researcher at the University of Vermont.
She received a Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 1997. She won a Best
Article
award from AFCPE for her article
Factors Related to Risk
Tolerance
in the 1996 volume of Financial Counseling and Planning.

Jamie Huyer Thompson, Retirement Programs: Reaching Midlife
Professional Women
, is a Consumer and Family Economics Specialist with
the University of Missouri Outreach and Extension. She serves four counties
in central Missouri. In 1997, Jamie received her Masters of Science in
Consumer and Family Economics from the University of Missouri. Prior to
her return to school, she was a Financial Consultant for six years.