Webinar: “The When, Why, & How of Creating Video for Instruction”

How many of us, in the development of our online courses, have wondered exactly when to include video, what type of video to include so that learning is positively impacted, and then how to create the video needed? In our most recent webinar, ODEE’s Jason Connelly, Instructional Designer for Distance Education, presented on how we can go about addressing such questions when planning to integrate video in our instruction. You can view and listen to the webinar recording by clicking the following link, The When, Why, & How of Creating Video for Instruction, or copying and pasting into the address bar of your web browser: http://carmenconnect.osu.edu/p2fjyrgyhtg/.

Join us on November 27th from 12:00 – 1:00pm when Anna Brady of the Dennis Learning Center will present on strategies for maximizing motivation of students in an online course.

Register for Maximizing Motivation webinar here.

AccessEDU Episode 7 – Rahim Abdi

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Episode 7 – Rahim Abdi

“We want to remove access barriers, right? So, we don’t want to lessen the experience for anyone else. We just want to ensure an equivalent experience for users with disabilities. So more often than not we end up with a much more accessible and much more usable product [for everyone].

In this episode of AccessEDU, your host interviews Rahim Abdi, an accessibility analyst and homegrown expert to learn more about the technical side of accessibility.

Referenced in this episode:

Read a transcript of episode 7

 

AccessEDU Episode 6 – Margaret Price

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Episode 6 – Margaret Price

“The fact that a book is all stuck together in one piece, in a sense, is an adaptive technology because otherwise we would probably lose pages … If we start thinking of all features of technologies, whether they’re print technologies or digital technologies as adaptive for some reason, then students start to get really excited and interested.”

In this episode of AccessEDU, your host interviews Margaret Price, a professor in the disability studies program at OSU. She shares insights into her strategies for making her classroom more inclusive.

Referenced in this episode:

Read a transcript of episode 6

Strategies for Curtailing Plagiarism

As someone who has taught online university courses since 2009 and taught high school level social studies for 13 years before that, I have met many colleagues who share similar experiences teaching.  One commonality? Academic integrity is something we all strive to promote in our courses yet still find elusive in some respects. We try different methods for monitoring student activity in Canvas tests and quizzes and we develop writing assignments that are more authentic in nature in hopes that we get an authentic product from our students as a result. I came across this short article offering up three other strategies we can implement in our courses to help alleviate plagiarism. If you have any strategies that have worked well for you, whether online or face-to-face, please feel free to share them in reply to this post.

Article link: Keys to Stopping Plagiarism

ODEE DELTA Webinar Recording (4/5/2018): “They Know, They Care”: Recovering Struggling Students in the Online Context (Audrey Begun and Jennie Babcock)

photograph of a lifeguard in a lifeguard stand on a beach near sunset or sunrise, with empty beach to the right of the picture, taken from behind, very scenic

Lifeguard by Md. Shafiul Alam Chowdhury

Recording available at http://carmenconnect.osu.edu/p4hzrdo7e7v/

It is easy (well…) to tell when a student in your in-person class is struggling: you can see their detachment, their boredom, their sleeping, their scowling, their sadness, their confusion, their disappointment. Online courses don’t provide the same access. In some cases, an instructor may never lay eyes on a particular student. So how does a person even know that a student needs help?  And when you know, what can you do about it?  Are we compelled simply to write off some percentage of our online students as lost sheep?

Dr. Audrey Begun and Dr. Jennie Babcock offer some concrete strategies to resist that fatalism in this webinar (recorded Thursday, April 5, 2018).  Drawing on their years of experience in teaching and advising, as well as insights and methodology from the discipline of Social Work, they describe four domains of specific steps instructors can take to reduce the likelihood students will start to struggle, recognize quickly when it is happening, and intervene usefully.

Recording available at http://carmenconnect.osu.edu/p4hzrdo7e7v/

What is Digital Flagship? (webinar recording)

Last week we were excited to host Cory Tressler from ODEE for a webinar discussion about Digital Flagship.  He explained what it is and how it will impact the university and paused for Q/A throughout.  If you were unable to attend the webinar live, below is a link to the webinar recording.  (Please pardon the abrupt start of the recording as the preliminary introductions were inadvertently cut off.)

If you have any questions about Digital Flagship, please email digitalflagship@osu.edu.

Webinar recording: http://carmenconnect.osu.edu/p85i2euixuw/

AccessEDU Episode 5 – Anna Voelker

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Episode 5 – Anna Voelker

“[Astronomy] is just completely full of mystery that scientists get to constantly investigate. In terms of accessibility, what really kickstarted it was a class here at Ohio State, called Shakespeare and Autism.”

In this fifth episode of AccessEDU, Megan interviews Anna Voelker, a senior at OSU who was recently awarded the President’s Prize to complete a project at the intersection of astronomy and accessibility.

Referenced in this episode:

Read a transcript of episode 5

Webinar Recording: Metacognition Online (10/17/2017)

Webinar recording available at: http://carmenconnect.osu.edu/p5517xb3ik4/

To update the old adage: teaching a person to fish is great and all — certainly better than giving them fish — but what if we could do better?  What do you call it if you teach them how to get constantly better at fishing?  How to judge their own fishing skills honestly and make intelligent choices about where to focus their efforts?  How to make use of research about the feeding patterns of fish populations to avoid wasting effort and maximizing returns?

Ok, that’s probably enough with that metaphor. 🙂

In the DELTA webinar hosted on October 17, 2017, Dr. Matthew Stoltzfus (Chemistry) described the cutting-edge practices he has adapted from research-driven guides (like Saundra McGuire’s Teach Students How to Learn) and developed to intervene effectively with the mostly-lower-level students in his Introduction to Chemistry courses.  Beginning with the simple (but oft-overlooked) recognition that there are different levels of understanding and proceeding through an array of proven strategies, Dr. Fus helps students understand precisely what new ways of thinking college will demand of them (that high school did not) and how they can take concrete steps to grow those new wings.*

 

*The growing of wings being the ultimate goal of learning, according to Plato’s Allegory of the Chariot.

Webinar Recording: A Beginner’s Guide to the Ohio State eLearning Toolset (8/31/2017)

View the recording at http://carmenconnect.osu.edu/p458d5horg7/

You know the old saying, “When all you have’s a hammer, the whole world looks like a nail”?  Back when I started with ODEE (before it was ODEE), that was nearly true of the tools available to instructors at Ohio State: there was Carmen and there was CarmenWiki.  Since then the toolset has grown like the pit crew for a NASCAR team, and there is no longer just a single way to do most things.  To help sort through the options and provide a high-level map of what-all systems are available for free to every instructor at Ohio State, our colleague Valerie Rake stopped by the studios at Mount Hall on August 31, 2017 to present a basic explanation and illustration for each system, as well as details about how to get help getting started.

Accessible Teaching: Start Now

Another semester has rolled right up to your door and started knocking. You’ve thrown on a robe (whipped up a course plan) and opened the door. But every semester is a bit different and our goal here at ODEE is to make sure you’re fully dressed before the knock sounds. But before you consider yourself fully dressed, it’s time to talk about accessibility, the hat to top it all off.

Accessibility is the assurance that all students, no matter their ability, will have access to your educational materials and learning experiences. There are many things to consider when making a course accessible, and many issues are eliminated by using an accessible learning management system (Carmen). But for the remaining considerations, when should you get started?

NOW.

David Gooblar writes that now is the time to think about accessibility. And I agree. We have always desired to empower people to be proactive about accessibility rather than reactive. Any preparation you can do to accommodate your diverse student body will save you time in the end and make students feel more welcome across the board. Gooblar argues that thinking about accessibility isn’t much different than thinking about how you will deliver a lecture powerpoint, notes, or give a review session before an exam. These are all accommodations you make as educators – to help students learn. Therefore, modifying assignments to make them more flexible for diverse learners, is no different than going out of your way to produce a study guide.

“We’re wrong to think of accommodations as exceptions that detract from our normal way of doing things. Accommodating students is our normal way of doing things.”

Build accessibility and UDL into your teaching, allow the possibility of a diverse student body to inform the way you plan activities. Slowly but surely, embracing the language of accessibility and inclusivity will not only make you a better educator, but will also set you up to learn the technical ins and outs to practice what you preach.

Add language to your syllabus that reflects your approach to accessibility and accommodation. Inside Higher Ed recently highlighted an OSU English professor, Jessie Male, who added the following language to her syllabus:

“I assume that all of us learn in different ways, and that the organization of any course will accommodate each student differently. For example, you may prefer to process information by speaking and listening, or you might prefer to articulate ideas via email or discussion board. Please talk to me as soon as you can about your individual learning needs and how this course can best accommodate them.”

Male made an effort to bring personalization and empathy to the boiler plate language we copy and paste into our syllabi. Read through our introduction to universal design for learning to plan how you will incorporate accessibility into your teaching. Begin to familiarize yourself with the language of accessibility, both in the physical world and the online environment. Gooblar’s article links to an excellent resource developed by Anne-Marie Womack called Accessible Syllabus. It gives a general overview of everything an instructor should consider about their teaching practice as it relates to accessibility. Read up, attend our accessibility workshops, and tackle every semester fully dressed.