ODEE DELTA Webinar: Simplify Your Teaching Life with Office365 (2/16/2018)

It’s tempting to be glib and introduce the link to this webinar recording about Office365 with a snarky reference to 90s retro, maybe by embedding a grunge cover of “Macarena,” but the thing is, we’re actually excited by this. Basically every instructor and student at Ohio State now has a license to Office365, which means we now have access to a better-than-Google-Docs platform for students to share files, simultaneously edit documents, spreadsheets, and presentations, and otherwise write in multimedia formats online.  Office has been around for a while, and that means that your students (and you!) already know how to use it, so there is that much less training you’ll need to do to make use of it.  It even integrates directly into Carmen.

In this webinar, our colleague Instructional Designer extraordinaire Tim Lombardo explains in more detail how to set up Office365, some of the complications you might need to work around, and some of the fancy and awesome things your students can do with it.  Thanks especially to the attendees, who asked excellent questions.

http://carmenconnect.osu.edu/p7wn1km2km5/ (recorded 2/16/2018)

 

PS. Having mentioned a grunge cover of “Macarena,” it would seem cruel not to embed an actual instance of the genre… (OK, strictly speaking it’s metal. What can I say? It was a crazy decade. Some lines blurred.)

APPQMR April 07, 2017 at Columbus State Community College

An opportunity is available for Faculty and Staff for official Quality Matters training hosted by the Ohio Quality Matters Consortium.

As part of this consortium we are able to participate in this day long, consortium hosted Applying the Quality Matters Rubric Workshop training free of cost.

For a description of what the workshop is about, deadlines, registration information and meals provided please click here to see the attached pdf.

Please note that this is not through The Ohio State University, but the Ohio Quality Matters Consortium. Interested Faculty and Staff will need to follow the attached registration process and it is on a first come first serve basis to the entire consortium. The participant will need to provide their own transportation, laptop with a wireless connection and their own Quality Matters APPQMR Workbook for the training.

Note: Please read the flyer if you need to bring your own Quality Matters APPQMR Workbook with you, or if one will be provided.

Registration Contact: Please see the flyer for registration information
Registration Website: Applying the Quality Matters Rubric Workshop by CSCC Digital Education and Instructional Services

If you have any questions about obtaining a workbook or other QM related questions, please feel to contact me at lombardo.89@osu.edu

Thank you,

Tim Lombardo
OSU Quality Matters Coordinator
Office of Distance Education and eLearning

DELTA Kickstart Week: A Student’s Perspective

Instructional Designer assisting kickstart week participants in the Digital Union.

So, I did the math. I’ve been in school mode for the past 16 years. I certainly don’t recall using the Internet for school activities as a 2nd grader in 2002, but I know that gradually, technology did become a big aspect of my education. And now, as I prepare to graduate from OSU and embark on a fully online master’s degree program, there is absolutely no escaping eLearning. Educators across our campus are embracing the inevitability of eLearning as the norm.

Which brings us to Kickstart Week…

This is why the Distance Education Learning and Teaching Academy (DELTA) January 2016 Kickstart Week exists. As a student assistant with ODEE, I had the opportunity to help facilitate this past week of learning and collaboration with educators from a wide range of OSU departments. Kickstart Week, for me, was also an intensive training on all things Distance Education.

For the group of 10-20 educators that participated in the program, they got the chance to build a course in Carmen, play around with new software and applications, and ask questions. Most importantly, they heard so many of my fantastic coworkers speak on topics such as: accessibility, Quality Matters standards, building rubrics, academic integrity, design basics, video recording, copyright law, and mobile security.

Sitting on the sidelines all week, I saw these professors light up when talking about their areas of expertise. They found new and exciting ideas for representing course content in different ways.

We explored a wide array of free online content building websites, some of which are included in the padlet below.

http://padlet.com/mfogel8/iuae84rixkpi

A new perspective…

Having never been on the teaching side of a course, it was fascinating for me to see how much consideration these professors put into their work. I was also able to share from my experience as a student at OSU, offering them different examples of how my professors have handled the situation being discussed. Walking away from Kickstart Week, I know the participants now have the ability to develop beautiful and smart online courses.

Blog post written by Megan Fogel, ODEE Student Assistant, and submitted by Jessica Phillips.

 

OSU Quality Matters Spotlight: Janice Aski, PhD.

Janice Aski, PhD.: Associate Professor and Director of the Italian Language Program. College of Arts and SciencesPicture of Janice Aski

Which of the QM Workshops did you participate in?

“The Applying the Quality Matters Rubric (APPQMR) online workshop”

What was the QM workshop process like for you?

“I have never taken an on-line course before, so I found the stress of always knowing I had work to turn in and not wanting to fall behind a bit difficult. But I did enjoy the sense of accomplishment after each module.”

About how long did it take you each week to complete the QM workshop?

“An hour or two. Never as long as they said it would take.”

What were some of the successes you had with the QM workshop?

“Understanding each of the standards and seeing how difficult it is to create a solid on-line course.”

What were some of the challenges with the QM workshop?

“Just the stress :)”

What were some of the lessons learned during this QM workshop that you hope to use in your current and/or future online of hybrid courses?

“I am the chair of the Arts and Humanities Curriculum Committee and a member of the ASCC. After taking the course I was able to assess and critique the new course proposals for on-line courses and identify their strengths and weaknesses. Many instructors seem to forget the amount of information that has to be communicated to the students in writing because we are used to talking to them in person. Moreover, I am writing my own on-line course and I found the information about linking course activities to goals and objectives particularly useful.

What is some advice you would give someone wanting to go through their first QM workshop?

Don’t worry, it is not as time consuming as you think and the information gained is worth the time.”

What motivated you to get involved with Quality Matters?

“I created a series of hybrid Italian language courses and did a comparative outcomes analysis with traditional F2F courses and found, despite my best efforts, that the hybrid results did not measure up to those in the F2F courses. I have always been suspicious of the on-line trend and never really believed that the two delivery systems could be equivalent. I made adjustments to my hybrid courses after the analysis and have yet to do another equivalency study. Interestingly, enrollment in my hybrids (which meet 2 days/week and 2 days of work is done on-line) are dropping and students favour the four day/week courses. This may be a trend only in foreign languages, or it may be an indication that students simply can’t organize their time and keep up in on-line courses. In fact, I had to eliminate the 1000-level hybrid courses because a significant number of students ended up having to drop or flunked because they did not do the work outside of class. I am assuming that their young age (most freshmen) is a factor in this trend. Despite our best efforts at warning the students in advance what is involved in an on-line course, it appears that the wrong type of student enrolls.

In short, since the on-line trend is not going to end, I am an advocate for quality in the on-line environment.

Moreover, if an instructor, like me, has never taken an on-line course, s/he needs guidance in the process of creating a course.”

How do you see QM impacting students?

“Better course organization may translate into student success and retention rates. We need to set our students up for success.”

How do you see QM impacting OSU?

“We need to keep up with what I perceive to be a national trend – quality assurance for on-line courses.”

How do you see QM growing at OSU?

“I will ask the ASCC to consider including a copy of the standards and the annotations in our ASCC manual for instructors to consult when they put together an on-line course. This is a first step.”


Contact The Ohio State University Quality Matter Coordinator, Tim Lombardo at lombardo.89@osu.edu to learn more about Quality Matters and learn more how OSU faculty and staff can be compensated for the cost of training through the ODEE Quality Matters Grants.

All Quality Matters related ODEE Distance Education blog posts can be found at the Quality Matters category of the ODEE Distance Education Blog

Not So Lone Stars: Connecting the Global #QMmunity Using Social Media

Happy National Distance Learning Week (NDLW) 2015!

On Tuesday November 3rd, I had the opportunity to present at The 7th Annual Quality Matters Conference on Quality Assurance in Online Learning. The presentation was titled “Not So Lone Stars: Connecting the Global #QMmunity Using Social Media.”

A lack of resources – both funding and peer support – continues to be a barrier for institutions transitioning from traditional classroom structures to online or hybrid forums.  We know that faculty collaboration, both institutionally and nationally, is key to successful delivery change.  How can we use our existing resources to provide scalable and sustainable tools to support faculty with this delivery change?

Since Quality Matters’ inception in 2006, over 56,000 online educators have engaged with the program.  More than 10,000 individuals use the MyQM portal each month.  We know where to find online educators – online.  But how do we connect them to support one another and to share best practices?  One answer is the use of social media.

According to research related to social networking, as of January 2014, 74% of online adults use social networking sites.  How can we as educators take advantage of this population to grow a global community of Quality Matters practitioners?

In this session, we described, demonstrated, and discussed ideas to leverage the power of free social media tools to help build and grow Quality Matters at your institution/organization. We also explored a variety of social media outlets and resources and provide examples of how other institutions have used these platforms on the local, state and national levels.

You can view the video from the presentation as well as download the presentation below!


Contact The Ohio State University Quality Matter Coordinator, Tim Lombardo at lombardo.89@osu.edu to learn more about Quality Matters and learn more how OSU faculty and staff can be compensated for the cost of training through the ODEE Quality Matters Grants.

The ODEE Quality Matters blog can be found at the ODEE Quality Matters Blog

Slides and Video are posted with permission.
Quality MattersTM © 2008 MarylandOnline, Inc.

The College of Education and Human Ecology Ed Tech Talk: Catherine P. Montalto and Quality Matters

On August 12th, 2015, The Quality Matters (QM) Program, a nationally recognized, faculty-centered, peer-review process that certifies the quality of online courses, has recognized The Ohio State University’s, Catherine Montalto’s CON SCI 3940 The Multicultural Consumer: Methods of Data Analysis commitment to quality assurance by designing courses that meet Quality Matters standards.

Join us as Dr. Montalto talks about her experience with Quality Matters and going through the Quality Matters Review process. What are the positives of the experience? Which areas were not so positive? What were some of the lessons learned?

Along with Dr. Montalto guest speakers will include: Sarah Bear, EHE Interim Director of Educational Technology; Kelvin Trefz, EHE Educational Technologist; and Timothy Lombardo, ODEE Instructional Designer and University Quality Matters Coordinator.

Date: October 14, 2015
Time: 11:30am – 12:30pm
Location: Campbell Hall 252
Registration: No Registration Required


Contact The Ohio State University Quality Matter Coordinator, Tim Lombardo at lombardo.89@osu.edu to learn more about Quality Matters and learn more how OSU faculty and staff can be compensated for the cost of training through the ODEE Quality Matters Grants.

The ODEE Quality Matters blog can be found at the ODEE Quality Matters Blog

OSU Quality Matters Spotlight: Catherine P. Montalto, Ph.D.

Catherine P. Montalto, Ph.D.: Associate Professor. College of Education and Human Ecology Department of Human SciencesPicture of Catherine Montalto

What motivated you to get involved with Quality Matters (QM)?

“The primary factor that motivated me to get involved with Quality Matters was the potential to enhance student learning in a 100% online delivered course. In a 100% online delivered course, the instructional materials need to not only deliver the subject matter content to the students, but to also help the students use the instructional materials in order to be prepared for course assessment, and to ultimately meet the course learning objectives. When students understand how the parts of the online delivered course fit together, and are guided in the use of instructional materials, students learning is enhanced. Quality Matters helped me to develop instructional materials that meet these criteria.”

Why is QM important to you?

“Student learning and capacity building guide my scholarship and are very important to me. QM is a recognized body of knowledge and practice focused on design and delivery of instructional materials that produce defined and measureable student learning. As a teacher, the QM standards helped me focus on important course components and hone the components for clarity and effective use by the students.”

What is some advice you would give someone wanting to get involved with QM?

“The advice I would give someone who wanted to get involved with QM is to “do it”! From my experience as an instructor who submitted a course for QM Review, I appreciate the expertise of the members of the team that reviewed my course and provided suggestions and recommendations for improvement. In order for courses to be reviewed, good reviewers are needed, so if you are interested in becoming a QM reviewer, “do it”! I would also encourage instructors to use the Quality Matters standards to guide the development or revision of online courses in order to enhance student learning. From my perspective as an instructor, the changes I made to my course via the QM review process have improved the course navigation which better connects students with the content and the learning objectives.”

How do you see QM impacting students?

“Quality Matters focuses on clearly linking (or aligning) the course learning objectives with the instructional materials, learning activities, and assessment. When students are able to see how all the parts of a course are related, they are more likely to utilize the course components as intended and to achieve the course learning objectives – yielding student learning.”

How do you see QM impacting instructors?

“Most instructors “know” how the parts of the course are related, but Quality Matters makes these relationships explicit and provides instructors with an opportunity to carefully and clearly delineate these relationships. In this explicit process, instructors may discover missing components, or uncover unintended redundancy, and these weaknesses can be eliminated during the course revision process, resulting in a stronger, more cohesive course.”

How do you see QM impacting OSU?

“As Quality Matters continues to gain momentum at Ohio State and more courses become QM certified, Ohio State’s reputation as a provider of high quality online education will grow. The expanding QM community at Ohio State will generate more QM certified courses thus producing increased student learning.”

How do you see QM growing at OSU?

“Workshops and presentations on QM have increased knowledge and understanding of QM, and, in turn, have fueled interest in QM. Additionally, as more OSU personnel go through QM training and/or submit courses for QM review, word of mouth will also contribute to the growth of QM.”

Why is QM important for OSU?

“QM provides a “signal” of quality of online delivered courses, which can contribute to Ohio State’s reputation as a provider of high quality online education. QM provides recommendations for course design and delivery that enhance student learning which ultimately contributes to a quality educational experience for our students.”

Why is QM is important for Higher Education?

“QM is important for Higher Education because QM contributes to quality educational experiences for students — an important metric by which the value of higher education is assessed.”

What was the course review process like for you?

“Overall the course review process was constructive and educational. The course review process provided me with an opportunity to carefully and explicitly focus on the connections between the learning objectives of the course and all of the essential course components. Areas of omission or redundancy were identified and corrected in the process of preparing for the QM review. By following the QM standards, I was able to make changes in the course so that the course was more easily and efficiently navigated by the students.”

What were some of the challenges with the Course Review?

“The biggest challenge I faced with the course review was becoming familiar with and really understanding the QM terminology and the important distinctions between the QM Standards. The professional staff at Ohio State was very helpful in answering questions and providing examples that enabled me to grasp important concepts. Another challenge was simply protecting my time so that I could concentrate on completion of the detailed course worksheet for the QM review.”

What is some advice you would give someone wanting to go through his or her first QM review?

“My advice to someone wanting to go through a QM review is to work closely with the professional staff at Ohio State. I was fortunate to work with four members of the Educational Technology professional staff in my college over the course of my QM experience. My experience started with converting a face-to-face course to a 100% online delivered course. The development of the online course was guided by the QM standards. Once the online course was in place, I submitted the course for an informal QM review. The recommendations and suggestions from the informal review were incorporated into my course. Finally, the course was submitted for an official QM review, and the recommendations and suggestions from the official review were incorporated into the course. At every step in the process I worked closely with one or more members of the professional staff. The professional staff were excellent sounding boards and advisors”

What is one thing that you learned during this review that you hope to use in your future courses?

“The QM review reinforced the importance of clearly delineating relationships between learning objectives, instructional materials, learning activities, and assessment as the fundamental building blocks of a course. This is not a place to cut corners — take whatever time is necessary to clearly and explicitly delineate these relationships, and then developing the rest of the course will follow naturally.”


Contact The Ohio State University Quality Matter Coordinator, Tim Lombardo at lombardo.89@osu.edu to learn more about Quality Matters and learn more how OSU faculty and staff can be compensated for the cost of training through the ODEE Quality Matters Grants.

The ODEE Quality Matters blog can be found at the ODEE Quality Matters Blog

CON SCI 3940 Meets Standards in an Official Quality Matters Peer Review

On August 12th, 2015, The Quality Matters (QM) Program, a nationally recognized, faculty-centered, peer-review process that certifies the quality of online courses, has recognized The Ohio State University’s, Catherine Montalto’s CON SCI 3940 The Multicultural Consumer: Methods of Data Analysis commitment to quality assurance by designing courses that meet Quality Matters standards.

Catherine P. Montalto, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the College of Education and Human Ecology Department of Human Sciences.

Quality Matters has developed a widely respected set of standards for the design of effective online courses and a rigorous, faculty peer review process for applying these standards to existing courses. Through this process, reviewers provide instructors and instructional design teams with insights and recommendations that increase learner engagement, retention and satisfaction, and, ultimately, learner achievement.

The Ohio State University was recognized by Quality Matters for other courses including:

  1. Chemistry and Society (CHEM100D)
    • Faculty Developer(s): Barbara Pappas
    • Date Recognized: 2010-11-12
  2. Marriage & Society (SOCIOL 330)
    • Faculty Developer(s): Marie Mika
    • Date Recognized: 2012-03-13
  3. Online Learning Strategies and Skills (EDUPL 1159)
    • Faculty Developer(s): Lauren Hensley
    • Date Recognized: 2012-09-10
  4. Introduction to Psychology (Psych 1100)
    • Faculty Developer(s): Ryan Hansen
    • Date Recognized: 2013-04-22
  5. Quality Improvement in Advanced Nursing Care (NURSING 7480)
    • Faculty Developer(s): Carolyn Schubert
    • Date Recognized: 2013-07-05
  6. Quality Improvement in Doctoral Nursing Practice (NP 8480)
    • Faculty Developer(s): Carolyn Schubert
    • Date Recognized: 2014-08-13
  7. Dental Hygiene Educational Theory and Methods (DHY 6100)
    • Faculty Developer(s): Rachel Henry
    • Date Recognized: 2014-09-25

Timothy Lombardo

Contact The Ohio State University Quality Matter Coordinator, Tim Lombardo at lombardo.89@osu.edu to learn more about Quality Matters and learn more how OSU faculty and staff can be compensated for the cost of training through the ODEE Quality Matters Grants.

About Quality Matters Quality Matters

(QM) is a leader in quality assurance for online education and has received national recognition for its peer-based approach to continuous improvement in online education and student learning. QM subscribers include community and technical colleges, colleges and universities, K-12 schools and systems, government agencies, corporations, and other education-related organizations. https://www.qualitymatters.org/

DLA 2015 – Making Quality Happen at a Big Ten University

On Monday June 29th, I had the opportunity to present at The University of West Georgia’s Distance Learning Administration Conference. The presentation was titled “Making Quality Happen at a Big Ten University.” This session examined why OSU chose Quality Matters, as well as challenges in implementing quality standards at a large university. You can view or download the presentation below!

Contact The Ohio State University Quality Matter Coordinator, Tim Lombardo at lombardo.89@osu.edu to learn more about Quality Matters and learn more how OSU faculty and staff can be compensated for the cost of training through the ODEE Quality Matters Grants.

The ODEE Quality Matters blog can be found at the ODEE Quality Matters Blog

Citations

Adapted from the Fifth Edition, 2014 Quality MattersTM Rubric © by The Ohio State University

Quality MattersTM © 2008 MarylandOnline, Inc. Reprinted with permission by Grace Hall. Please contact MarylandOnline, Inc. for information or reprint permission.

OSU Quality Matters Spotlight: Susan Clark, B.S.Met.E. S, M.B.A.

Susan Clark, B.S.Met.E. S, M.B.A.: Senior Lecturer. Fisher College of BusinessPicture of Susan Clark

What motivated you to get involved with Quality Matters (QM)?

“I am always looking for ways to improve my classes and Quality Matters seemed like a great way to move my classes in that direction. Being a certified Peer Reviewer and Master Reviewer has helped me understand the QM Rubric and the standards necessary for having an excellent online course design.”

Why is QM important to you?

“QM brings standardization to the online environment and gives individuals a template to follow to address issues that might not have come to light in the design process. QM helps insure that faculty and course designers think about and consider all aspects of a course to make it transparent and easy for a student to use.”

What is some advice you would give someone wanting to get involved with QM?

“QM can be daunting when you first see the rubric and the number of standards that a course must meet to be certified. Don’t let that scare you! I think it provides a systematic approach for addressing the needs of an online or hybrid course.”

How do you see QM impacting students?

“QM will have a positive impact on students because it requires the course developers to put themselves in the students’ position to navigate a course. It addresses ADA issues and covers all the bases when it comes to making a course user-friendly.”

How do you see QM impacting instructors?

“Instructors who use QM become more aware of how their course might appear to a student. Instructors must try to think of how a student would want to move from place to place within their class and maybe change their thinking of how to deliver the material.”

How do you see QM impacting OSU?

“I think QM will help faculty and staff from various areas of the university collaborate and create a common base for online delivery. The material will obviously differ from course to course, but if OSU can create a common framework or shell for online delivery, it will help translate from area to area and more importantly, give students a common view for online courses. I think most frustration arises for students when they can’t find what they want or need quickly in an online environment. The more that OSU can do to help create this common framework, the more successful our students will be.”

How do you see QM growing at OSU?

“As more departments move to online courses and discover the benefits, I see QM growing at OSU as a way to get more people interested in the development process. QM will take the mystery and uncertainty out of delivering online courses and make it more accessible for all departments at OSU.”

Why is QM important for OSU?

“To remain competitive in the ever-changing technology environment, QM provides that standard to insure that new material is consistent and easy to access. QM allows OSU to market their materials and courses as QM certified which adds credibility to the online courses taught here.”

Why is QM is important for Higher Education?

“QM helps different colleges and universities share knowledge and develop materials with a fundamental core that is easily transferable from school to school. The common thread helps to start a dialog with other schools about how to best serve our constituents.”


Contact The Ohio State University Quality Matter Coordinator, Tim Lombardo at lombardo.89@osu.edu to learn more about Quality Matters and learn more how OSU faculty and staff can be compensated for the cost of training through the ODEE Quality Matters Grants.

The ODEE Quality Matters blog can be found at the ODEE Quality Matters Blog