Multimedia Innovation: Our Plan

Educational innovation is a top priority at Ohio State. Across our campuses, we strive to be at the forefront of a better and more modern student experience. Here at ODEE, we are no different. The Distance Education team works hard every day to make sure that our course design and development processes will lead to positive experiences and effective learning for online students.

A new wave of innovation has come into focus for our team in the form of multimedia advancement. Although we feel as though our multimedia efforts are already strong, we have developed an initiative that identifies some important work to be done in the next year (and beyond) that will allow faculty to present more dynamic and engaging course content to online students.

One of our bigger goals in the coming year is to get multimedia innovation integrated into our course design process. This means that there will be a section of each of our course designs that focuses solely on opportunities for multimedia advancement. Faculty will have conversations with our team to develop plans and identify possible work to be done in this area, which may include replacing a few traditional assignments with interactive, click-through activities, for example.

To go along with this, on our end, we will be developing a clear project management system that makes multimedia innovation easy for our faculty. A clear planning system will be drawn out and faculty will have the opportunity to complete clear and reachable goals surrounding multimedia improvements to their course(s).

Additionally, we are in the process of developing an ‘innovative tool guide’ that will help our instructional designers and online faculty identify tools that meet their innovative needs. Whether faculty are brand new to the multimedia game or have an idea that they are not quite sure how to execute, the guide will be there to provide answers. We are also piloting a storyboard that will be used to easily build out interactive projects.

We also have plans to explore the relatively new field of virtual reality, which has the potential to play a very interesting and impactful role in the world of online education. Additional new technologies will continue to challenge the way we do things on a daily basis.

All of these measures are being taken to ensure that our online students continue to receive the most dynamic and rich learning experiences possible. A few tweaks to traditional learning methods with an open mind of the advantages of multimedia learning can go a long way in greatly enhancing the student experience.

Over the coming months, be sure to revisit this blog for updates on our multimedia efforts. I will be sharing monthly updates, presenting easy-to-use tools that can make your courses better and sharing up-to-date research from the evolving world of multimedia eLearning.

Webinar Recording: Collaborating Live in an Online Environment

Male student studying with computer at 11th floor Thompson libraryWhether you are teaching an online, hybrid, or face-to-face course, at some point during the course you may want to engage with your students synchronously via the Internet.  You may have a remote guest speaker, a need for students to meet in groups, student presentations, you name it.  All of these experiences and more can be done through two OSU supported tools: Collaborations within CarmenCanvas and CarmenConnect.  On September 20th, Jacob Bane and Marcia Ham presented different ways each of these tools could be used to engage with students live outside of the traditional classroom.  Click the following link to view and listen to the recording of the 1-hour webinar:

Please join the Office of Distance Education and eLearning’s DELTA team on October 17th when Dr. Matthew Stoltzfus will present a webinar discussing the topic of metacognition in an online course.

Webinar Recording: A Beginner’s Guide to the Ohio State eLearning Toolset (8/31/2017)

View the recording at

You know the old saying, “When all you have’s a hammer, the whole world looks like a nail”?  Back when I started with ODEE (before it was ODEE), that was nearly true of the tools available to instructors at Ohio State: there was Carmen and there was CarmenWiki.  Since then the toolset has grown like the pit crew for a NASCAR team, and there is no longer just a single way to do most things.  To help sort through the options and provide a high-level map of what-all systems are available for free to every instructor at Ohio State, our colleague Valerie Rake stopped by the studios at Mount Hall on August 31, 2017 to present a basic explanation and illustration for each system, as well as details about how to get help getting started.

Accessible Teaching: Start Now

Another semester has rolled right up to your door and started knocking. You’ve thrown on a robe (whipped up a course plan) and opened the door. But every semester is a bit different and our goal here at ODEE is to make sure you’re fully dressed before the knock sounds. But before you consider yourself fully dressed, it’s time to talk about accessibility, the hat to top it all off.

Accessibility is the assurance that all students, no matter their ability, will have access to your educational materials and learning experiences. There are many things to consider when making a course accessible, and many issues are eliminated by using an accessible learning management system (Carmen). But for the remaining considerations, when should you get started?


David Gooblar writes that now is the time to think about accessibility. And I agree. We have always desired to empower people to be proactive about accessibility rather than reactive. Any preparation you can do to accommodate your diverse student body will save you time in the end and make students feel more welcome across the board. Gooblar argues that thinking about accessibility isn’t much different than thinking about how you will deliver a lecture powerpoint, notes, or give a review session before an exam. These are all accommodations you make as educators – to help students learn. Therefore, modifying assignments to make them more flexible for diverse learners, is no different than going out of your way to produce a study guide.

“We’re wrong to think of accommodations as exceptions that detract from our normal way of doing things. Accommodating students is our normal way of doing things.”

Build accessibility and UDL into your teaching, allow the possibility of a diverse student body to inform the way you plan activities. Slowly but surely, embracing the language of accessibility and inclusivity will not only make you a better educator, but will also set you up to learn the technical ins and outs to practice what you preach.

Add language to your syllabus that reflects your approach to accessibility and accommodation. Inside Higher Ed recently highlighted an OSU English professor, Jessie Male, who added the following language to her syllabus:

“I assume that all of us learn in different ways, and that the organization of any course will accommodate each student differently. For example, you may prefer to process information by speaking and listening, or you might prefer to articulate ideas via email or discussion board. Please talk to me as soon as you can about your individual learning needs and how this course can best accommodate them.”

Male made an effort to bring personalization and empathy to the boiler plate language we copy and paste into our syllabi. Read through our introduction to universal design for learning to plan how you will incorporate accessibility into your teaching. Begin to familiarize yourself with the language of accessibility, both in the physical world and the online environment. Gooblar’s article links to an excellent resource developed by Anne-Marie Womack called Accessible Syllabus. It gives a general overview of everything an instructor should consider about their teaching practice as it relates to accessibility. Read up, attend our accessibility workshops, and tackle every semester fully dressed.

Webinar Recording: Make and Use Open Resources with Tools and Support from the Affordable Learning Exchange (8/17/2017)

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“The [textbook] rent is too damn high!”  Learn what you can do to help your students avoid unpleasant dilemmas, such as needing to choose between textbooks and food.  ODEE colleagues from the Affordable Learning Exchange initiative stopped by the DELTA studios to discuss how elearning tools and collaboratives can enable you to reduce this burden on your students’ learning.

Webinar Recording: Teaching Large Courses Online (7/25/2017)

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In this webinar, Dr. Brian Lower  and his team, Kylienne Shaul and Ella Weaver, talked about some of the steps they have taken to develop a deeply engaging large online course, ENR2100: Introduction to Environmental Sciences. They will especially describe how they have used writing-based assessments and peer-review processes to enable students to think more deeply about the material and extend their understanding through interaction (in both on-ground and online versions of the course).

2013 in-person ENR Poster Session, the inspiration for a virtual poster session assignment that helps drive student engagement in the large course.  For more information and examples of student work, visit

AccessEDU Episode 3 – Tara Koger


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Episode 3 – Tara Koger

“It’s important to remember that visual experiences in looking at contrast is not a binary of normal vision and impaired vision. It’s really a continuum…”

In the third episode of AccessEDU, your host interviews an OSU educational technologist, Tara Koger about her tips for designing visually appealing AND accessible content and webpages.

Referenced in this episode:

Read a transcript of Episode 3

Ten Online Teaching Tips

Faculty working on laptops outside.As an online instructor who has been teaching in this mode since 2009, I am always keeping an eye out for strategies other online instructors use in their courses to make the learning experience more engaging for students while also maintaining the instructors sanity.  Preservation of our mental faculties is important if we are to be effective instructors.  To this end, I thought I would share a short article I came across the other day that highlights ten strategies you may or may not be using in your online classes to help manage the grading load and communicate with students: Ten Online Teaching Tips You May Not Have Heard.  While I admit that some of the tips given I am skeptical about jumping on board with immediately, others are strategies I’ve used that have helped out tremendously (creating a forum, rubrics, etc…).  Take a look through the article and see if you notice a strategy you might like to try out the next time you teach an online course.  After all, we don’t know how a strategy will work until we try it, right?


ODEE DELTA Webinar Recording: iOS Apps for Teaching and Learning (Adobe Spark Pages and ExplainEverything) (6/27/2017)

It is easy to get lost in the large and expanding universe of apps that you can use to improve learning in your courses. This webinar will introduce you to two of the best, Adobe Spark Pages and ExplainEverything, both of which make it easy to produce fancy multimedia content with minimal training or expertise.  That means you can use them as an instructor to produce richer, more engaging learning materials for your students without needing to sacrifice the hours required to become a proper web designer or videographer.  It also means you have two more tools your students can use to create shiny, personalized assignments that nevertheless stay focused on demonstrating the understandings and abilities that are the true goals of your course.

In this webinar recording, Scott Sheeler, Educational Technologist on ODEE’s College Ready Ohio team, provides a lively introduction to these apps and shows how to use them like a pro in this webinar originally presented on June 27, 2017.



Lectures? We Should Talk… Or Not

What Does the Research Say about Lectures?
It is well-established in the lore of online instructors and those who support them that lecture-centered teaching is not as effective as almost any other kind. Who wants to share the road with young drivers who only ever heard about how to steer but never got to try it yet? Who wants to be the first patient of a surgeon who got a solid B on all the quizzes but has not yet seen blood? Proper learning must include lots of opportunity for students to put their hands (and minds) to work. People learn by doing not listening. Humans can only pay attention to lectures for 10 minutes before losing attention, less online. (What is the longest cat video you ever watched? And cat videos are intrinsically awesome.)
It makes intuitive sense. But this is a university; we do evidence, not intuition. (And use semi-colons is obscure but technically acceptable ways.) As I was reminded recently by a colleague during a consultation, it’s not enough to be correct in academia. One must also share one’s bibliography.
So what is the evidence for the lecture lore?
The list below is intended to begin to answer that question by listing a few of the broadest, clearest, most influential, and most evidentiary write-ups on the subject. Thus, I will also include a request: if you have a bibliography you like to use — or even just a compelling research publication or persuasive presentation not included here — please add it in the comments below.