Using the BCC Field to Avoid a Mass-Email Faux Pas

Use of the BCC field to avoid a mass-email faux pas.

Did you know you can use the BCC field to avoid the awkwardness of mass replies to your emails?

In Outlook for Mac:

Outlook for Windows:

Outlook Web App (in a web browser):

You will first need to click the BCC button in the right upper corner.

A commonly asked question is, “If I put the recipient’s email address in the BCC field, what do I put in the ‘To’ field?” You do not need to put any address in the “To” field as long as you have an address in the BCC field. You can also address the email to yourself for archiving purposes.

If you are not seeing the BCC field, it may be hidden from your view in Options. Support documentation for Microsoft Office describes how you can show the BCC field.

Friendly reminder about remote access to CON drives:

You can access CON drives when you are not in Newton Hall by using our remote desktop server:

http://remote.con.ohio-state.edu/

Replacement for muting grades in Canvas

A recent change in CarmenCanvas takes away the ability to mute and unmute assignments. Instead, there is now the Grade Posting Policy. It can apply to the whole course, but we recommend applying it to individual grade items as needed.

The default is Automatic. You would change it to Manual before starting to grade submissions. Then post the grades when you’re ready.

View more information about the Grade Posting Policy on the Canvas website.

Qualitative Methods in Nursing Education

If you are evaluating your teaching practice or student interactions from the student perspective, you may have asked questions that factual data and numbers cannot answer.  You may need to explore qualitative research methods to find answers to questions about how students experience nursing education.  Dr. Judy Tate presented a workshop on the basics of qualitative research methods in nursing education on July 16, 2019, to share with faculty how a qualitative approach might facilitate exploration and development of innovative strategies in teaching and learning.  Judy covered the following topics:

  • General description of qualitative research designs
  • Knowing when qualitative designs are a good fit
  • Discussion of types of qualitative data
  • Steps in data collection and analysis in educational settings
  • Application of a basic qualitative approach to examples from healthcare education

View the recording of Judy’s session, and access her presentation and other materials.

Using Data Visualization for Learning, Research, and Quality Improvement

Tableau, one type of visualization software, can be used as a tool for teaching informatics and how to convey meaning behind data. It can also be used to share research and quality improvement project results. Dr. Lyn Hardy presented an overview of data visualization use in research presentations and funding proposals at the CON on June 18, 2019. She also described how Tableau is being used to educate OSU doctoral students in data use for patient care and leadership. Lyn concluded the session with a brief overview of Tableau and how it is used within the context of a pain data set. View a recording of Lyn’s workshop, and contact her if you would like to know more about data visualization with Tableau.  Her workshop slides are also available.

Manuscript Revision Tips

You have written your paper, submitted it, and now it comes back with numerous comments and suggestions and a four-week turnaround! What next? In this May 8 session for the Academy for Teaching Innovation, Excellence, and Scholarship, Dr. Rita Pickler described a general approach to responding to reviewer comments and offered some suggestions for addressing some of the “stickier” issues that reviewers raise. If you anticipate needing to grapple with the challenging task of responding to peer-reviewer feedback on your manuscripts, this session is for you. 
A recording of the session is available to people with an OSU username and password.

Three Tips for Carmen Course Setup

We have only a few days between spring and summer semesters to set up summer Carmen courses, so it’s important to be as efficient as possible during course setup.  These tips might help.

  1.  Page History:  Your Carmen course pages might have beautiful pictures and text formatting that can be ruined with just a single swipe of a misplaced cursor.  If you save changes on a Carmen page that you later regret, there is a solution!  Access Page History at the three-vertical-dots menu on the right side of the page (see 1 in the image below).  You can go back to a previous version of the page where you last saved changes you actually want.  For more detailed instructions, see the Canvas documentation.
  2.  Auto-open File Viewer:  Sometimes, you want a file that is attached to a page in Carmen to open automatically for students so they view it in the Carmen page rather than needing to download it and open it as an attachment.  Enable the “Auto-Open for Inline Preview” option to make this happen.  See the Canvas documentation on this feature.
  3.  I often hear requests for image sources where instructors can find “free” pictures to use in their courses.  Keeping in mind that many pictures on the internet can be copied at no cost, images should always be cited just like written resources are.  If you aren’t sure whether you should use an image or not, please contact your CON-IT team or your copyright librarian for more information.  You can find images that are designated for reuse by others at the following sites:

OSU Photography – scroll to the bottom of the page and click “Browse signature photo gallery”; mainly OSU-themed and higher-education-themed pictures
OSU Digital Storytelling – suggests sites that enable searches for content labeled for reuse
Unsplash – beautiful images on general topics (very few medical pictures)
Pixabay – another site with general image topics
HSL image resources – specific medical images for teaching related purposes; these have very specific terms of use listed here

Many thanks to Sarah Rusnak in the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences for sharing these resources and collaborating on these important Carmen tips!

Apple TV coming to all College of Nursing classrooms

The CON IT team is equipping all Newton Hall classrooms to be compatible with Apple devices (iPads, iPhones, Macbooks) so you can wirelessly project from your devices to the projector and screens in the classrooms. Currently, rooms 264 and 172 are ready to go with this new capability. Our plan is to equip all of our classrooms with Apple AirPlay this summer. For a step-by-step guide on how to connect your Apple device to the CON classroom equipment, follow the instructions on the wall near the classroom podium or refer to our one-page guide, Using the Apple TV.

Erik Yarberry installs Apple TV in Newton 172

Erik Yarberry installs Apple TV in Newton 172

John Pryba tests the Apple TV in Newton 172

John Pryba tests the Apple TV in Newton 172

How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts and Cultures

An important update to a National Academies Press resource on teaching and learning is now available online as a downloadable PDF book. The book incorporates research from the past two decades to expand on the original report from 2000. How People Learn II includes chapters that summarize theories related to learning and knowledge, theories related to motivation to learn, and use of digital technology for learning. These summaries can be very helpful when we are designing learning interventions and collecting evidence of their effectiveness in the process of educating nurses. The new (and free) edition of this book can make underpinning your learning design with theory and evaluating the outcomes a little easier.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2018). How people learn II: Learners, contexts, and cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/24783