Essential Oils for Stress and Anxiety

Essential oils are commonly used for a variety of reasons, but is there really any benefit to aromatherapy? Studies have shown that certain smells can be associated with both negative and positive emotions and memories. For example, the smell of a dentist’s office can bring anxiety to some patients but may be overcome with use of essential oils to block the negative smell. Lavender, on the other hand, is a common essential oil used as a calming agent and its use has been studied in a number of patients experiencing different types of stress and anxiety with beneficial results.  These studies found that stress and anxiety and their associated effects were decreased with the use of lavender. Overall, people experienced better sleep, lower heart rate, and lower blood pressure when exposed to lavender aromatherapy.

It is recommended to use these oils via a diffuser rather than by mouth or inhalation. Some topical formulations are manufactured and are mostly safe when used as directed but stop use if any reaction occurs.  Overall, essential oils are associated with minimum side effects when used as directed and for short durations. They act quickly with no possibility of dependence, tolerance, or withdrawal.  If only diffused, these oils can be used in addition to prescribed medication with no interactions.  If you have any questions ask your primary care provider or pharmacist before using essential oils.

 

-Erin Coddington PharmD Candidate 2019

 

Malcolm BJ, Tallian K. Essential oil of lavender in anxiety disorders: Ready for prime time? The Mental Health Clinician. 2017;7(4):147-155. doi:10.9740/mhc.2017.07.147.

 

“I never get sick… I do not need the flu shot”

Are these your thoughts when asked if you will get the flu shot this year?

Everyone’s immune system works differently so some people get sick more often than others. Just because you “never” get sick does not mean you are invincible from getting the flu. Influenza is spread by respiratory droplets (from sneezing, coughing, or even just talking) which can directly or indirectly be spread from person to person. If an infected person sneezes and then touches a door handle, you are at risk of getting infected just from touching that same door handle. All it takes is one infected individual on campus to be able to spread it to many, many others.

 

Why should you get vaccinated against the flu?

Influenza is a potentially serious disease that can lead to hospitalization and sometimes death. Each flu season is different, and influenza can affect people differently, but millions of people get the flu every year. Of those millions, hundreds of thousands of people are hospitalized and thousands or tens of thousands of people die from flu-related causes every year. An annual influenza vaccine is the best way to help protect yourself and others against the flu. Vaccination has been shown to have many benefits including reducing the risk of flu illnesses, hospitalizations and even the risk of flu-related death in children.

 

How do flu vaccines work?

The flu vaccine contains dead strains of the influenza virus. When vaccinated, these injected dead viruses cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine. Therefore, if you are exposed to the flu later in the season, your immune system will be ready to defend you from getting infected with the virus. A lot of people claim that they get sick right after receiving the vaccine. It is scientifically impossible to get the flu from the vaccine since dead viruses are injected and it takes two weeks for your body to develop antibodies. The reason some people may feel flu-like symptoms after getting the vaccine is because your body’s immune system is triggered when injected with the vaccine but that is a risk with any vaccine you receive.

 

Who should get vaccinated this season?

Every person over the age of 6 months old should get a flu vaccine every season. The reason you need to get a vaccine every year is because each year, the strains of viruses are a little bit different. Therefore, a new vaccine is created each year to protect you against the projected strains of influenza for that given year.

 

 When should you get vaccinated?

You should receive your flu vaccine before the flu begins spreading in your community since it takes two weeks for your body to develop the antibodies necessary to protect you. The CDC recommends that people get a flu vaccine by the end of October each year.

 

Where can you go to get vaccinated?

You can get your flu shot conveniently right on campus at the student health center! Flu shots are available at the pharmacy located on the ground floor. In addition, you can get your flu shot at your doctor’s office, clinics, health department, or at any retail pharmacy.

 

Lindsay M. Ecclestone, PharmD Candidate 

 

References

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/keyfacts.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/spread.htm

 

Combatting the Freshman 15

Make healthy choices to avoid the Freshman 15

Make healthy choices to avoid the Freshman 15

Welcome to college! The next 4 years will be the best years of your life. There’s nothing like leaving home for the first time, jumping into the bliss of independence and making bad decisions. You’ll be able to stay up as late as you want, over sleep your alarm, and consume way too many empty calories while tailgating the football games. College seems amazing! You have access to all the food you want and no parental supervision….I mean come on who wouldn’t want to have a late night slice of pizza, three servings of ice cream at traditions or even a warm chocolate chip cookie when you’re finished with lunch. But if you’re not careful the dreaded freshman 15 can catch up to you real quick and those brand new jeans you just bought, to look good at the game next weekend, will no longer button. So here is some advice on how to avoid gaining those extra 15 pounds no one wants to admit to gaining.

  1. Hire someone to smack that cookie out of your hand you pick up at the dining hall after every meal.  Since most students have no self control over the delicious sweets that are put in front of them, you can put someone else in charge of keeping your diet more healthy.
  2. Set an alarm for 5 minutes before a huge exam. This way when you wake up late and freak out that you’re not going to make it to your exam on time it forces you to run to class. You’ll realize how out of shape you are and get yourself back into the gym.
  3. Speaking of the gym, you may join a club sport to play recreationally since you use to play in high school. After practice you’re going to want to sit down and eat with your friends. Remember starting left bench is not the same as actually playing in high school. You can’t expect to eat the same and lose weight.
  4. In high school you were probably use to your parents cooking you dinner every night, making sure it was somewhat healthy…well in college they’re not here to cook your meals. So if you live close enough, go home to have them feed you. That way you won’t have to worry about consuming 1,000 calories from a loaded potato pizza from the PAD.
  5. If you don’t live close enough, it’s time to start paying attention to what you are eating. Everything has calories. Maybe you should rethink your order of an asiago cheese bagel with cream cheese, a cookie and a large buckeye mocha latte. If you eat that every morning I can promise that you will not be able to button your pants in a couple of weeks.
  6. Dining halls have so much delicious carb heavy food. Who wouldn’t want to eat pasta, with broccoli cheese soup and churro cupcake every single day? I can tell you it feels really good walking around feeling extremely full and bloated…But maybe try adding some plants into your diet. A good fresh salad (not smothered in ranch, bacon and cheese) or a side of vegetables instead of french fries can taste delicious and help combat that disgusting bloat you’ve been feeling for the last 4 days.
  7. Remember that water is your best friend. The first sign of thirst is hunger. You may have no insight as to whether you’re hungry or thirsty. Next time your stomach is growling after you consumed gross take out Chinese, try drinking a full glass of water. You maybe more thirsty than hungry (since we all know Chinese food is filled with salt and MSG).
  8. Water is also essential for keeping our body healthy. Granted a nice refreshing pop or juice can taste delicious at times but depriving your body of water can do more harm than good. Water has this magical power to make you feel full, especially when bored. Try increasing your water intake to 8 glasses a day. Rule of thumb is you want your urine be light yellow to clear. So when you go to the bathroom next and your urine is bright to dark yellow, you know you’re not drinking enough water.
  9. It is inevitable to not feel stressed while taking 12 credits and going out every night. I mean why would you start studying for a test now when you can put it off until the night before and cram. Try to eliminate getting too stressed out. An increase in stress can lead to stress eating as well as increased hormones. This can ultimately lead to weight gain and acne you haven’t seen since you hit puberty.
  10. Make sure you are getting enough sleep to be productive. It may not be a good idea to go see “IT” if you know you’re not going to sleep for the next 10 days. Many times when you’re over exhausted you start grabbing for sugary substances to keep you awake. This does not help with trying to avoid gaining weight.
  11. But when you don’t sleep enough, energy drinks always sound like a great idea. Next time you grab one why don’t you flip the can around and look at the calories. With over 200 calories in a Monster energy drink, you may want to rethink grabbing those empty calories. Opt for some black coffee or tea. But if you have to have that energy drink maybe try grabbing for one of the sugar free or low calorie ones.
  12. When all else fails just go out and buy bigger clothes. Your student loans will really appreciate being spent on new clothing that one day you’ll have to payback at 5% interest.

Remember as a student it is really easy to fall into a bad routine since it’s a lot of people’s first time away from home. While many people joke about gaining the freshman 15, it happens to the best of us. Just be conscious about what you consume. You are probably not working out as vigorously as you did in high school, so you can’t eat the same way. College can be a stressful at times. Find ways to cope with stress whether it’s meditation, exercise or a hobby. It is best if you don’t turn to food during the stressful times. And if all else fails, go talk to someone about getting healthier. Take advantage of the registered dietitian at Student Health Services. They are here to help discuss your diet and encourage you to make the lifestyle changes you want to make. And if scheduling an appointment with the registered dietitian doesn’t fit into your schedule there are other options available on campus at the wellness center in the RPAC. You do not have to gain the freshman 15…it is up to you.

Dayna Gewolb, PharmD Candidate Class 2018

 

Can I drink beer while on medication?

OSU football is in full swing, and this may mean an increase in alcohol consumption during the months to come. There are many drugs that interact with alcohol to some extent. These interactions can either metabolize medications and decrease the medications effectiveness, or can have the opposite additive effect and increase the risk of toxicity.

Here is a limited chart of studied alcohol-drug interactions and the risk/warnings of combining the two, be sure to ask your pharmacist about any drug-drug interactions before taking your medication:

Common OTC/Prescribed Medications Clinical Effects Recommendations
Pain Medications:
Acetaminophen (can be found in multiple OTC/prescribed drugs) Acute alcohol use in large amounts can increase risk of liver toxicity Do not consume >3 alcoholic drinks/day while taking this medication
Aspirin (Excedrin), ibuprofen (Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve) Increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding Do not consume >3 alcoholic drinks/day while taking this medication
Codeine, hydrocodone + acetaminophen (Norco, Lortab, Lorcet, Vicodin), oxycodone + acetaminophen (Percocet, Endocet) and tramadol (Ultram) Co-ingestion may lead to respiratory failure, increased dizziness, sedation and can potentially be fatal Avoid alcohol consumption while on these medications
Antidepressants/Seizure medications:
Amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), clomipramine (Anafranil); and bupropion (Wellbutrin/Zyban); phenytoin, perampanel (Fycompa) Increased risk of sedation, dizziness, fainting; may also increase risk of seizures; may cause psychiatric effects Minimize or avoid alcohol use, speak to your doctor/pharmacist about alternatives
Diabetic medications:
Glyburide (Diabeta), metformin (Glucophage) and insulin therapies May cause vomiting, nausea, headache, muscle or stomach pain and visual disturbance. Unpredictable effects while on insulin may occur Avoid heavy alcohol consumption (>3 drinks/day)
Antihistamines:
Diphenhydramine (Benadryl, ZZZquil) and doxylamine (Sleep Aids) Increased risk of sedation and dizziness Advise against alcohol consumption, speak to your doctor/pharmacist about alternatives
Antihypertensives:
Amlodipine (Norvasc), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Procardia), atenolol (Tenormin), and metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL) Increased risk of dizziness and fainting

 

Advise against heavy alcohol consumption (>3 drinks/day)
Antimicrobials:
Doxycycline (Vibramycin), ketoconazole, metronidazole (Flagyl), and isoniazid May decrease effectiveness of medication, as well as increase risk of vomiting, nausea, stomach pain. Isoniazid and alcohol may cause liver damage Advise to avoid alcohol on all antimicrobial agents ask your pharmacist about interactions with your medications

 

Next time someone hands you an alcoholic drink and you are taking medication, ask yourself… is it worth the risk?

 

Justin Corpus

PharmD Candidate 2018

References:

  1. Alcohol and Drug Interactions. Pharmacist’s Letter/Prescriber’s Letter. December 2015.

Still struggling with acne in college? We’re here to help!

Did you come to college hoping to leave the battle with acne behind you in high school? I know I did. Fortunately, there are many treatment options for mild acne available at the Student Health Services Pharmacy that do not require a prescription. If you are experiencing more severe breakouts (>10 pimples at once) you should make an appointment with your doctor or dermatologist before treating yourself.

General Skincare Advice:

Make sure you wash your face twice a day with a gentle cleanser, such as Cetaphil. It is also important to take off any makeup before going to bed. Try and avoid touching, picking, or squeezing any pimples as it may cause permanent scarring. There are some studies that suggest dairy and diets high in sugar may cause acne, but no specific dietary changes are currently recommended for acne control.

Over-The-Counter (OTC) Options for Acne:

Benzoyl Peroxide (BP)

How does it work? BP kills bacteria that typically causes acne and helps unclog pores.

What’s out there? BP comes in washes, foams, creams, and gels in a variety of strengths.

What side effects does it cause? You may experience redness and peeling while using BP.

What else should I know before trying it? BP can bleach fabrics or hair, so wash your hands after use and avoid contact with with clothing and furniture. You will also want to make sure that you put on sunscreen while using it because it may make you more sensitive to the sun. BP can be used alone or in combination with a topical retinoid.

Topical Retinoids

How do they work? Retinoids help to keep your pores unclogged.

What’s out there? Several options exist, but only adapalene (Differin) 0.1% gel is currently available without a prescription.

What side effects does it cause? Retinoids can cause dryness, peeling, redness, and irritation. If you experience any of these side effects, cutting back use to once every other day may help.

What else should I know before trying it? You may see an initial increase in acne and redness, but these side effects should get better after a few weeks. Make sure to wear sunscreen while using because retinoids can cause sun sensitivity. Adapalene gel and other retinoids can be used alone or in combination with benzoyl peroxide.

Salicylic Acid (SA)

How does it work? SA helps to remove top layers of skin and unclog pores.

What’s out there? SA comes in washes, cleansers, creams, gels, and lotions in a variety of strengths.

What side effects does it cause? Salicylic acid may cause dryness or peeling.

What else should I know before trying it? Increased contact time on the face may help with how well salicylic acid works (meaning that cleansers and washes may not be as effective as other formulations).

Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHAs)

How do they work? AHAs work as exfoliating agents for the skin.

What’s out there? Citric, glycolic, and lactic acids are the most commonly seen AHAs.

What side effects does it cause? AHAs may cause irritation or skin sloughing.

What else should I know before trying it? AHAs are also included in many anti-aging skin care regimens.

Topical Sulfur

How does it work? It is still unknown how sulfur helps with treatment of acne.

What’s out there? Several creams and lotions are available. Sulfur is sometimes found in combination with salicylic acid or resorcinol.

What side effects does it cause? Sulfur has the potential to cause some skin scaling, especially on darker skin tones.

What else should I know before trying it? Sulfur products may be more useful for short-term spot treatment. Some older sulfur products have a strong odor that can be bothersome.

Complementary Alternative Medicine (CAM): tea tree oil

How does it work? Tea tree oil kills bacteria that typically causes acne and helps with inflammation.

What’s out there? Tea tree oil comes in creams, gels, sprays, and patches.

What side effects does it cause? A small percentage of people may develop a rash when using tea tree oil.

What else should I know before trying it? Tea tree oil has been shown to work as well as benzoyl peroxide in some studies, but it may take up to 12 weeks to see the full effects. Only use tea tree oil topically because it can be toxic if ingested.

This is just a short list of what skincare options are out there for the treatment of acne. Many products are prescription only, such as oral and topical antibiotics, hormone therapy, azelaic acid, and isotretinoin (Accutane). If your acne is severe enough you may need to see a doctor for one of these medications.

Don’t forget that your doctors and pharmacists at the Student Health Center are here to help if you have any questions or want a recommendation!

Allison Carr, PharmD Candidate 2019

References

  1. Adapalene (topical), alpha hydroxy acids, benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, sulfur (topical), and tea tree oil. Lexi-Drugs. Lexicomp. Wolters Kluwer. Hudson, OH. Available at https://online.lexi.com. Accessed June 5, 2018.
  2. Zaenglein MD, Pathy AL, Schlosser BJ, et al. Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris. J Am Acad Dermatol . 2016;74(5):945-973. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2015.12.037.

 

Want a better alternative to sports drinks? Try Pedialyte

Dehydrated from the weekend? We have good news for you! The Student Health Services Pharmacy is now carrying Pedialyte products. Both the liquid and powder packs will be kept on the shelves to help you recover.

How do you know if you’re dehydrated? Some signs of dehydration include dry mouth, thirst, dark colored pee, headache, and dry skin.

What does your body need when it’s dehydrated? Water of course! But plain water may not be enough for your body. That’s where something like Pedialyte may come in handy. These products contain the chloride, potassium, and sodium electrolytes that your body has lost. Sports drinks and juices may contain too much sugar (which can cause some diarrhea) so more balanced drinks like Pedialyte are recommended for rehydration.

What are some causes of dehydration?

Alcohol

It’s no secret that alcohol is dehydrating and can make you feel terrible. See a previous blogpost on hangovers here and visit http://partysmart.osu.edu/ for more information on responsible drinking and the effects of alcohol. So what you can do to help beat dehydration from alcohol use? Pre-hydrate with drinks like Pedialyte, and don’t forget to drink more before going to bed after a night out. 

Exercise

As you probably know, sweating from exercise can cause enough electrolyte and water loss to dehydrate you. If you feel tired, lightheaded, or notice any of the other symptoms above, make sure to get plenty of fluids in. 

Food Poisoning or Stomach Flu

Diarrhea and vomiting can both cause significant dehydration. After experiencing either of these symptoms, it is important to replace the electrolytes and fluid that is lost. If you think you can manage your symptoms on your own, be sure to only take small sips of Pedialyte at a time and eat a bland diet to not make your symptoms worse.

Contact your doctor if you are severely dehydrated, also have a fever > 101⁰F, experience diarrhea more than 6 times a day, have severe abdominal pain, are pregnant, notice any blood in your stool or vomit, or symptoms continue for over 24 hours. 

Heat

Spending a little too much time at Oval Beach? Sweating it out on the Oval or by the pool while you work on your tan may actually cause some dehydration. Bring fluids with you the next time you decide to lay out.

Travel

Believe it or not, travelling by plane can be very dehydrating. Moisture in the air decreases as you increase in altitude on a flight. You can stay hydrated and still comply with TSA liquid rules by bringing Pedialyte powder packs with you on any upcoming flights.

Stop by the Student Health Service Pharmacy to pick up some Pedialyte today! Our pharmacists are also available to answer any questions you may have about dehydration or the products we carry.

Allison Carr, PharmD Candidate 2019

References:

  1. Baugh CW, Graff L. Observation medicine and clinical decision units In: Walls RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill M, editors. Rosen’s Emergency Medicine. Elsevier; 2018.
  2. Blumen IJ, Rinnert KJ. Altitude physiology and the stresses of flight. Air Med J. 1995;14(2):87-100. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10143549. Accessed June 8, 2018.
  3. Ferrari SP, Welch A. Nausea and vomiting In: Krinsky DL, Ferrari SP, Hume AL, Newton GD, Rollins CJ, et al., editors. Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs: An Interactive Approach to Self-Care. Washington DC: American Pharmacists Association; 2015.
  4. Guttman J. Nausea and vomiting In: Walls RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill M, editors. Rosen’s Emergency Medicine. Elsevier; 2018.
  5. Lazarciuc. Diarrhea In: Walls RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill M, editors. Rosen’s Emergency Medicine. Elsevier; 2018.
  6. Oral rehydration solutions. Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1983;25(629):19-20.
  7. Walker PC. Diarrhea In: Krinsky DL, Ferrari SP, Hemstreet B, Hume AL, Newton GD, et al., editors. Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs: An Interactive Approach to Self-Care. Washington DC: American Pharmacists Association; 2017.

From meal plan to apartment plan

Its apartment time!

You put in your dorm time, but now you are free.  Free to find an apartment and free from the food plan and you are certain this will save you money. Think carefully about what lies ahead in this department and ask yourself some questions.

Where is the closest

Adjusting from meal plan to apartment plan

full grocery store?

 

Do I know who much groceries cost?

How will I get there? Do I have a backup plan if the first one does not work?

Do I know how to menu plan so I can create a grocery list?

What, if anything, do I know how to cook from scratch or a box?

What will be my budget for food including groceries and eat out?

How big is the refrigerator and how will we divide the space?

Will my roommates and I keep food individual or will we make group meals?

Over the summer, before you move into that apartment, practice grocery shopping and acquire a sense for cost. Think about meal planning. Learn what to keep on hand in your college pantry. Practice packing lunches over summer if you will do that in the fall. Build a library of 15 minute meals for when you are pressured for time.  Research college friendly cooking.  Here’s a great book to get you started:

The $5 a Meal College Cookbook: Good Cheap Food for When You Need to Eat by Rhonda Lauret Parkinson, B.E. Horton.

Kristina Houser, LD

Medical Marijuana

Cannabis is also called marijuana. Its psychoactive properties are primarily due to one cannabinoid: delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and THC concentration is commonly used as a measure of cannabis potency.

The legal status of cannabis use, for medical as well as recreational purposes, varies internationally as well as across the United States. In Ohio, House Bill 523, effective on September 8, 2016, legalizes medical marijuana. However the program will not be fully operational until September 8, 2018. The Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program will allow people with certain medical conditions, to purchase and use medical marijuana. This is after the recommendation of an Ohio-licensed physician certified by the State Medical Board.

Patients will require an identification card. The only valid state ID cards will be issued by the State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy once the state’s patient registry becomes available no later than September 2018. Please note that no patient identification cards are being issued by the state of Ohio’s Medical Marijuana Control Program (MMCP) at this time.

Certified physicians may recommend medical marijuana only for the treatment of a qualifying medical condition. Under Ohio law, all of the following are qualifying medical conditions: AIDS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Crohn’s disease, epilepsy or another seizure disorder, fibromyalgia, glaucoma, hepatitis C, inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, pain that is either chronic and severe or intractable, Parkinson’s disease, positive status for HIV, post-traumatic stress disorder, sickle cell anemia, spinal cord disease or injury, Tourette’s syndrome, traumatic brain injury, and ulcerative colitis.

Patients taking cannabis for medical treatment should consider:

  • Prior experience with cannabis – Patients with no prior experience with cannabis are more likely to experience the psychoactive effects as dysphoric rather than pleasurable. Patients who are regular cannabis users are more likely to be tolerant to some of the adverse effects, eg, cognitive and psychomotor impairment.
  • Cannabinoid content – “Dosing” of cannabis is determined by the means of administration, frequency, and amount used as well as the cannabinoid content of the recommended strain (especially in terms of THC and THC:cannabidiol ratio).
  • Route of administration:
  • Smoked and inhaled cannabis have a rapid onset of effect which is typically minutes and relatively short duration of action which is typically two to four hours. These routes are preferred by some patients because they allow frequent and precise titration of dose to effect (eg, analgesia).
  • Oral cannabis has a slow onset of effect (typically half to one hour) and long duration of action (typically 4 to 12 hours). This may lead to inadvertent overdosing; when patients don’t experience effects as soon as they expect, they may take another dose, resulting in a cumulative overdose. This is especially likely by patients familiar with the rapid onset of smoked or inhaled cannabis

At this time The Ohio State University Wilce Student Health Center is not participating in Ohio’s Medical Marijuana Program however you can find updates at : Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program 
http://medicalmarijuana.ohio.gov

Annmarie DiMeo

September is National Fruits and Veggies-More Matters Month

September is National Fruits and Veggies-More Matters Month. 90% of Americans do not eat the amount of fruits and vegetables recommended. There are many benefits to trying to include more in your diet including:

  • Increase variety and flavor to you diet
  • High in vitamins and minerals
  • High in fiber
  • May reduce diseases including heart diseases and some cancers
  • Easy to prepare

Try to consistently fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables at every meal. Also, try to include them with your snacks. All forms of fruits and vegetables count toward your daily intake including fresh, frozen, dried, and canned. Consider trying a new fruit or vegetable to your diet each week.

Dr. Matthew Peters, MD

 

VOICES: A Herpes Support Group

First meeting: September 4, 2018

A diagnosis of Herpes can feel overwhelming and isolating, but it does not have to. Voices is a group designed to provide a safe, confidential space in which to:

 

  • share experiences
  • learn accurate information about transmission
  • explore treatment options
  • learn how to live with the virus
  • hear from a medical professional as well as others living with Herpes

VOICES is confidential and open to anyone:

  • all genders and ages
  • those living with Herpes
  • those simply wanting to learn factual information

VOICES is held:

  • first Tuesday of each month, 4pm – 5pm
  • Wilce Student Health Center, room 360
  • attendance is free, no registration required

Facilitated by Sarah Philip, CNP, Certified Nurse Practitioner, Student Life Student Health Services