Managing Spring Grass Growth and Selective Grazing

Rory Lewandowski, Extension Educator, Wayne County, Crossroads EERA

For most beef cattle farmers who are managing their pastures in a rotational grazing system two of the biggest spring challenges are the flush of rapid growth that will occur and selective grazing. While there are no easy management answers, if we review some basic plant growth biology and grazing principles, they may suggest some management strategies. Warning: this article may disrupt some conventional thinking.

We know that as spring progresses, grass growth will speed up. Our cool season pasture grasses produce about 60% of their total dry matter production by early July. If your farm has Continue reading

Could you be grazing?

Chris Penrose, Extension Educator, Agriculture & Natural Resources, Morgan Co.

When we think of extending the grazing season, we usually think of how long we can go into the fall or winter without feeding stored feed. Another option often overlooked is how soon we can stop feeding as spring approaches.

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Over the years, there has been a lot of discussion on how Continue reading

Carefully Consider the Alternatives for Improving Damaged Pastures

Rory Lewandowski, OSU Extension Educator, Wayne County and Stan Smith, OSU Extension PA, Fairfield County (reprinted from the Ohio Cattlemen’s Magazine, February 2012)

Starting with a late summer drought in 2010 that led to overgrazing of some pastures, and then proceeding to the wettest year in recorded Ohio history in 2011, many forage fields have suffered from excessive traffic, trampling and reduced and damaged stands. As we head towards a spring full of renewed promise, one key decision many are facing regards whether or not to reseed the pasture or hay fields that have suffered from Mother Nature’s abuse in recent years.

Like every other input cost, the price of grass and legume seed has increased. What are the options to get these abused pasture paddocks back into a productive forage? Let’s look at several Continue reading