Trans-Species Skins

Trans-Species Skins is a themed art exhibition exploring skin as a metaphor and substance that transcends species categories. Skin is the multilayered and multipurpose organ that shifts from thick to thin, tight to loose, wet to dry, across the landscapes of bodies and machine interfaces. Natural and artificial skin responds to heat, cold, pleasure and pain. It lacks boundaries and flows seamlessly from exposed surfaces to our internal cavities real and virtual. It is a self-repairing, semi-permeable surface, with inner layers that are flush with nerves and glands, sensors and chips. New tools allow artists, designers, and engineers to look at a new emerging organicism that takes shape across the surface of the grown and manufactured. Skins can modulate meaning, touch, function and can provide feedback and change with light and heat. Flexible membranes embedded with sensors and materials are bent, impregnated, or inflated to become structure. Re-skinning allows deceit; the non-living can approximate life, and the living can appear otherwise.

This semester, students in the Art & Technology courses – ranging from animation, art-science, digital imaging, and 3D modeling to robotics –  have created individual and group artworks related to this theme and they will be presenting them in this juried exhibition.

Opening Wednesday, December 6, 5:00pm – 8:00pm

Open hours: Thursday, December 7, 11:00am – 5:00pm & Friday Dec 8, 11:00am – 4:00pm

Where: Hopkins Hall Gallery, Lobby, Corridor, and Collaboratory – directions

Admission is free and open to the public

 

 

Media in Motion – May Class

Professor Isla Hansen will teach a new course this summer called Media In Motion: Exploring cause and effect in animation, sculpture, and interactive experiences

Advanced Computing Center for the Arts and Design, The Ohio State University

May short term, 2017

M/W/F – 12:00 – 4:00pm

(T/TH – optional open lab time 12-4pm)

Location: ACCAD and Hopkins 171

email: Hansen.492@osu.edu

Filter Bubbles and Inequality

Filter Bubble is an Art & Technology Student Exhibition open to the public Wednesday, December 7, 2016 to Friday, December 9, 2016. Located in Hopkins Hall Gallery, Lobby, Corridors, Collaboratory and New Media Labs – all on the first floor of Hopkins Hall.

Reception: Wednesday, December 7 from 5-8 PMFilter Bubble banner
Filter Bubble is a themed, new media art exhibition that examines the hyper-personalization of information surrounding each of us, based on algorithms that are trained by our individual interests and world views. Students working in 3D animation, 3D modeling and rapid prototyping, robotic art, internet art, game art, and moving image art forms will exhibit their investigations into the meanings, consequences, and futures of a citizenship shaped by like-minded viewpoints.

What does it take to break your filter bubble? Is it possible to see through someone else’s?


The Center for Ethics and Human Values, is offering awards to artists in the exhibition – and throughout the Department of Art Open House  – who have made compelling artwork related to the theme of Inequality.

Moral concern with inequality is about far more than economic inequality. It is also about political, legal, educational, and health inequalities and how these interact with each other. And it’s about how these inequalities connect with underlying issues of race, gender, ethnicity, religion, LGBTQ status, geography, and other factors. These different dimensions of inequality are often difficult to appreciate, especially when we do not experience them firsthand. An artwork can change this. An artwork can force us to confront the significance of inequalities we often overlook. Submissions will be evaluated both for artistic merit and for how they explore issues related to the COMPAS theme.

This contest is open to:

  • Graduate and undergraduate students currently enrolled in a class in the Department of Art
Prizes:
  • Grand Prize, $500
  • Up to 3 awards of excellence, $250 each
  • Up to 12 awards of distinction, $50 each
All types of art presented at the Department of Art Open House are eligible: painting/drawing, sculpture, glass, photography, art and technology, printmaking, ceramics, etc.
Your work must be presented in the Department of Art Open House or Filter Bubble exhibition, December 7th 2016, in order to be considered.
Entrants must register by December 6th: http://go.osu.edu/inequality-art-registration
Winners will be announced by email and on our social media accounts on December 9th.

Fuse Factory exhibition and workshops

3b8ee652-ed8a-47f8-84c4-a527b034dc83Exciting events going on this month with Fuse Factory, our local non-profit organization promoting electronic and digital arts. Check out the workshops (many free for OSU students) and the exhibition Anthropocene, opening Saturday, Nov 19 at the Pearl Conrad Art Gallery in Mansfield, Ohio. 6 – 9pm.

Art and Tech alumnus Doo-Sung Yoo directed the exhibition and brought in Internationally-known artists, Victoria Vesna, Paul Catanese, and Matt Kenyon to jury the show.

Big congrats to all the Art and Tech alumni involved!

·         Bill Randall, presenting artwork in the exhibition

·         Andrew Frueh, presenting a workshop on 3D printing

·         Jessica Ann, presenting a workshop on Electronic Art & Arduino

·         Christopher Summers, presenting a workshop on Virtual Reality

·         John Cairns, presenting a workshop on Video Projection Mapping

More info: http://thefusefactory.org/2016_ffe/

Accepting applications to our MFA Program now

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Apply to the Masters of Fine Art, emphasis in Art & Technology, at the Ohio State University

MFA students in Art develop their practices within and beyond the context of seven studio areas: art and technology, ceramics, glass, painting and drawing, photography, printmaking, and sculpture. Students in the Art & Technology area take courses with 3 full-time faculty in Art & Technology, plus 20 more faculty across the Department of Art, including Ann Hamilton, recipient of the National Medal of Arts. Students benefit from affiliated faculty in Film Studies, Physics, the Advanced Computing Center for Arts and Design (ACCAD), Architecture, Molecular Genetics and the Nanotech West Lab. Interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary experimentation that forges connections to other departments is encouraged.

The curriculum balances intensive studio-based coursework with university electives. Our 3-year collaborative MFA program offers its students an opportunity to extend and deepen their studio practices within the expanded context of a research university. The vast majority of our students are fully funded by Graduate Associateships (GAs) for all 3 years of study.

Each graduate student is provided with a private, or semi-private studio, as well as access to facilities dedicated to the production of interactive and robotic art, game art, large-format imaging, moving image art, and collaborative spaces for the development of new forms.

Deadline for International Students: November 30, 2016
Fellowship deadline for Domestic Students: December 31th, 2016
Deadline for all required application materials for Domestic applicants: January 31, 2017

/~~~~/ (2016) Installation, HD video and sound, performance by Andrew Wood.
/~~~~/ Installation, video, sound, performance by current graduate student Andrew Wood

Machines Triggered by the Ghost of Thomas Eakins

Art and Tech MFA alum Fernando Orellana’s has a solo show at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (PAFA), recently reviewed by Hyperallergic. To summon the ghost of Thomas Eakins to Philadelphia through art machines and nude models, robots are constantly sampling three different measurements: electromagnetic, temperature, and infrared. All three of these are what pseudo-scientist and paranormal researchers measure when they try to detect ghost activity.

 

Maker Faire Ottawa

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Selfie Moment, by Ethan Schaefer

Art and Tech students and faculty and alumni presented work at Maker Faire in Ottawa Canada in a special art exhibition titled Preternatural, co-curated by Ohio State University Professor Ken Rinaldo and Maker Faire curator Remco Volmer. They invited artists whose works address the perspectives of animals, media and technological representations, ecosystems, futures, coevolution, symbiosis and friction between human and non-humans. These included 3D rapid prototyped sculptures, 3D animations, robotic artworks, performance and moving image art installations.

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Makezine wrote a story about the Preternatural exhibition
Ada Fruit story on Simon
AdaFruit wrote about Jeremy Viny and Andrew Frueh’s project in the exhibition

Invited artists: Madeleine Rico, Jeremy Viny, Trademark Gunderson, Jordan Reynolds, Ethan Schaefer, Catherine Lee, Danner Seyffer-Sprague, Danielle Popp, Yoni Mizrachi, Sarah Goetz, Amy Youngs, Grant Parish, Casey Hamilton, Daniel Popp, Christine Rucker, Katherine Beigel, Drew Grigsby, Christina Howard, Kyler Holland, Maggie Barrie, Riley Patrick, Makayla Combs, Nick Cunningham, Hui Yang, Jayne Kennedy, Brandon Messner, Jacob Markusic, Brandon Ball, Michael Anderson, Leah Lafarciola, Gaopeng Chen, Jay Young and Ken Rinaldo.

Special Thanks to the United States Department of State for the generous grant allowing travel funds for these artists and to Maker Faire Ottawa for this generous opportunity as well as the Department of Art at the Ohio State University in supporting this international opportunity.

Where Rocks are Fed to Trees

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The faculty and students of the Underground Symbiosis class are ready to show you something you’ve never seen before.

We invite you to experience Where Rocks are Fed to Trees, an art installation inspired by the subterranean, fungal communication networks that enable the sharing and transport of nutrients between different species.

This multi-channel video projection environment was collaboratively created within the context of an Art/Science course at the Ohio State University, Art 5001: Underground Symbiosis: the art and science of mycorrhizal networks. This co-taught course built on synergies between Professor Iris Meier’s research in Arbuscular Mycorrhizae and Professor Amy Youngs’ ecosystem installation artworks. Together, with 16 undergraduate students, we performed scientific experiments such as microscopy, staining, chemical analysis and plant growth trials, to better understand mycorrhizae. Artistic methods, such as observation, speculation, synthesis, manipulation, construction and presentation, were also employed throughout our investigations, which have culminated in this co-created, immersive, art/science installation.

It will be presented as part of the Art and Technology exhibition, Loving the Obligate Symbiont, in Hopkins Hall, at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. We invite the public to join us for the reception on Monday, April 25th, 5 – 8pm. Or visit during open hours on April 21, 22 or 25th. More info.

Artists: 

Trent Bailey, Brandon Ball, Katherine Beigel, Gaopeng Chen, Tyler Collins, Sarah Hockman, Shatae Johnson, Eric Lo, Jacob Markusic, Iris Meier, Yoni Mizrachi, Julianne Panzo, Edwin Rice, Ethan Schaefer, Aaron Theesfeld, Robert Ward, and Amy Youngs.

Special thanks to our supporters:

  • The Department of Molecular Genetics
  • The Department of Art
  • College of Arts and Sciences Small Grant Program
  • Biological Sciences Greenhouse
  • Chadwick Arboretum

And thanks to the following individuals, for inspiring our class with presentations and technical assistance: Eduardo Acosta, Dr. Ana Alonso, Jean-Christophe Cocuron, Dr. Dobritsa, Anna Griffis, Norman Groves, Kim Landsbergen, Joan Leonard, Galen Rask, and Emily Yoders-Horn.

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More class photos here.

 

Art & Tech Exhibition: Loving the Obligate Symbiont

Loving the Obligate Symbiont celebrates the value of the intertwined symbiosis that makes all living systems possible. This themed, new media exhibition includes 3D animations, robotic art, internet art, tactical media, art inspired by mycorrhizal networks, digital art, installation, 3D modeling and rapid prototyping, digital video and algorithmic approaches to representing the concept of our interdependence with living systems and non living, emergent machine intelligences.

"Where Rocks Are Fed To Trees" an installation by Art/Science course.
Where Rocks Are Fed To Trees immersive art/science installation.

This bi-annual juried exhibition highlights art-making and experimentation in the Art and Technology area of the Department of Art during Spring Semester 2016. Be sure to see the immersive art installation created by students and faculty in a co-taught art/science course on display in room 340.

Open Hours:
Thursday 4/21: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Friday 4/22: 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Monday 4/25: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Reception: Monday, April 25, 5-8PM

Where: Hopkins Hall Gallery, Lobby, Corridor, Collaboratory, & rooms 156, 162, 340.
Hopkins Hall, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Map and info on how to get here by bike, bus, or car & parking.