ACEL Students named to Autumn Semester Dean’s List

During Autumn Semester 2018, 70 students from the Department of Agricultural Communication, Education, and Leadership were named to the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences Dean’s List.

Congratulations to these students for their outstanding work in the classroom.

 

Agricultural Communication
Madeline Bauer
Alexis Elliott
Keri Felumlee*
Hanna Fosbrink
Joanna Frankenberg
Christina Gaerke
Paige Hamrick
Jane Hulse*
Mary Jenkins
Kathaleen Kuhn
Kasey Miller
Emma Newell
Meredith Oglesby
Bailey Pees*
Makayla Petersen
Haley Plahuta
Eva Scott*
Sydney Snider
Maria Stavridis
Zachary Steiner
Linnea Stehens
Marlee Stollar
Kamala Sweeney
Kalyn Swihart
Maura Waitkus
Kiersten Wright

Agriscience Education
Gabrielle Adair
Jenna Alfman
Ellen Andres
Megan Bergman
Maryellen Bliss
Makayla Eggleton
Kristen Eisenhauer
Troy Elwer
Kayla Erickson
Katie Fath
Alexis Howell*
Wyatt Jones*
Alaina Kessler
Klayton Kilzer
Samantha Kline
Elizabeth Landis
Madison Layman
Cody McClain*
Summer McLain
Abigale Motter*
Devon Mullen
Julia Naus
Milan Pozderac
Ellyse Shafer*
Sydney Stinson
Claire Vilagi
Kayla Walls*
Barbie Warthman
Brittany Weller
Chloe Wilson*
Emily Wilson
Haley Wilson

Community Leadership
Madison Allman
Trenton Baldwin
Melanie Fuhrmann*
Courtney Hovest
Allyson Irwin*
Emma Johnson
Sarah Longo*
Allyson McCurdy
Amelia Michaels
Emily Paulsen
Kayla Ritter*
Rachel Stoneburner*

* indicates a 4.0 GPA

Intern Spotlight: Cassady Interns with Wren Farm Events as Event Manager

Hailie Cassady
senior
agricultural communication

My name is Hailie Cassady and I am a senior studying agricultural communication, and I have been interning with Wren Farm Events in Mechanicsburg, Ohio as an event manager/coordinator since April.

Wren Farm is an event venue located 35 minutes from Columbus and 45 minutes from Dayton. The venue primarily hosts weddings but can accommodate functions such as high school proms, homecomings, dinner parties, showers, etc. This wedding season (late April through early November) we had 26 weddings booked and at this point we have 21 of those completed.

The facility is a two story, historic barn that was formerly used to house livestock such as dairy cattle, hogs and sheep. The hay mound was converted into the reception area and the downstairs features the original feed troughs which is where buffet style meals are set up.

Being an event manager, I have been involved in multiple weddings and have worked with a lot of different people. I am involved in the touring and booking process, taking deposits and payments, preparing contracts, sending out vendor forms to upcoming brides to get their vendor information and how they want their space set up, setting up tables and chairs prior to couples arriving to decorate and then assisting with decorating inside and outside of the barn, setting up ceremony seating, helping with food, drinks and trash and any other last minute things that the couple may need.

I have really enjoyed working with all of the different couples and seeing the barn set up in so many different ways. Wedding planning and coordinating is a lot more demanding than I expected when I first started but it is fun to be busy and on your feet, making the couple’s special day everything that they expected! I love that I get to be involved in the entire process and work alongside different people all the time. Every weekend is something completely different and I like that aspect of it.

Cassady, agricultural communication

 

Wren Farm Events

Internship Spotlight: Plahuta Completes Summer Internship 

Haley Plahuta
senior
agricultural communication

Throughout the last spring, I had the pleasure of helping put on the Ohio Farm to Cafeteria Pre-Conference and the National Farm to Cafeteria Conference. This opportunity came about after I saw an advertisement for the conference in a flyer.

The national conference is put on by the National Farm to School Network, an information, advocacy and networking hub that serves communities by using local food, school gardens and food and agricultural education in schools and early care settings. With my major being agricultural communications and working towards minors in youth development and Spanish, farm to school combined both of my interests. I found out that they were not only interested in having a volunteer, but would be willing to help me count the experience towards an Ohio State internship credit. This was in January and over the next four months, I worked as a Farm to School Communications Intern out of Campbell Hall to help promote the conference to people across Ohio.

The National Farm to Cafeteria Conference was planned for Cincinnati in May. Carol Smathers, OSU Extension specialist and the Ohio Farm to School Program Coordinator and Amy Fovargue, OSU Extension, were responsible for an Ohio-focused pre-conference. Most of my work involved promoting the pre-conference, which included an Ohio producer showcase with tables from companies like DNO Produce, Peaceful Fruits and Cincy Beef. There was also a panel of speakers from the local food industry and round tables for guests to discuss issues and topics surrounding local food.

While promoting the pre-conference, I learned a lot about event planning and especially the importance of staying organized. I used various tactics to help promote the conference as well as excel sheets to keep track of all email lists and publications that highlighted the event. I promoted the pre-conference through mass emails, press releases and Facebook. I found Facebook to be especially helpful. I had not previously experienced using Facebook to set up an event page and learned some of the benefits and challenges of this media platform.

I also worked with Ohio State’s Office of Trademark and Licensing Services to ensure that our branding was compliant with the University’s brand on the Farm to School website, flyers and post cards. I helped update the Farm to School website, created a monthly flyer that contained information about the upcoming conference. For these flyers, I used the approved OSU templates. I also developed postcards to hand out to promote the pre-conference. Working on the website, flyers and postcards provided a valuable learning experience. I also had to build in time to receive feedback and edits for the branding to be approved. This taught me to build in extra time when working with others.

Throughout this internship, I learned more than I could have imagined about event planning. This experience was especially unique because of the event being a pre-conference with a national conference happening the following day. I feel that the work I did helped prepare me for a job that includes event planning and creating promotional materials such as postcards, flyers, press releases and a website.

Table decorations for the conference that Plahuta made.

 

Plahuta (left) with Amy Fovargue (middle), and Michaela Graham (right), another intern who helped with the conference.

Intern Spotlight: Emily Beal Interns with The Kentucky Exposition Center

Emily Beal
junior
agricultural communication

During the summer of 2018 I had the pleasure to intern for The Kentucky Exposition Center, where I worked in the horse show office. While I was only an intern, the knowledge and experience I received while working in Louisville were immeasurable.

The horse show office was responsible for putting on an array of horse shows through out the year, those shows being: the Quarter Horse show, the state 4-H show, The NAILE Draft horse show, and finally The World Championship Horse Show. While all of these shows were important, the primary focus was on The World Championship Horse Show while I was interning.

In preparation for the biggest saddlebred show in the world, our office covered many tasks. Keying entries, talking on the phone to exhibitors/trainers/owners, making the program book, mailing entries out, and creating a show bill; these tasks and many others were done to ensure the show would go smoothly.

I myself had the pleasure of being the voice of the fairgrounds for the Quarter Horse Show. I was stationed at the eagle’s nest where I announced what class was being judged, which exhibitors needed to check in for their class, and finally the class order. Through this task I gained confidence in public speaking, as my voice carried through out the entire fairgrounds.

Interning for the Expo Center was a an extremely rewarding experience. The lessons I learned and connections I made will stay with me forever.

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Emily Beal, agricultural communication

 

Intern Spotlight: Stephens Interns with Beck’s Hybrids as Sales Intern

Linnea Stephens
junior
agricultural communication

Hello! My name is Linnea Stephens, and I am a current third year student at The Ohio State University majoring in Agricultural Communication with a minor in International Economic Development. This past summer of 2018 I worked with Beck’s Hybrids as the Ohio Sales Intern. The territory that I worked within was Northern, Ohio and some parts of Lower, Michigan.

Stephens at Beck’s Hybrids Headquarters located in Atlanta, Indiana

Prior to this summer internship with Beck’s Hybrids, my only experience within the seed industry was with my internship with Nutrien Ag as their undergraduate research intern the summer before. After talking to one of the District Sales Manager I was assigned to work with this summer, we decided the sooner I could start my internship the better it would be for the sales team in Ohio. Therefore, I traveled to Atlanta, Indiana for early safety training and onboarding, and started two weeks early as an intern.

Tasks and projects that I completed this summer ranged daily. From planting field plots, scouting, cold calling on potential customers, maintaining expense reports, transferring seed, and leading customers in private Practical Farm Research Tours, it made my summer go extremely fast. Every day I woke up not knowing exactly what I would be doing each day, and that is what I loved that about my internship this summer with Beck’s.

Traveling to Beck’s Hybrids headquarters in Atlanta, Indiana for formal training allowed me to meet college students across the Mid-West. Representing The Ohio State University among other college students gave me a opportunity to share how classes here on campus have prepared me to become a young professional in the Ag based industry.

Leading and organizing private Practical Farm Research tours this summer at the London, Ohio location was one of most rewarding experiences I had this summer. With a total of 3 tours, 54 attendees, and over 27,000 acres accounted for the tours were deemed a success by the Ohio sales team.

Being chosen as one of 23 interns this summer for a seed company is truly a humbling experience.  Therefore, this summer I was not only a representative of Beck’s Hybrids, but a Buckeye as well. Many individuals think that sales internships are only about how much you can sell within a three-month period, and I can now say that sigma is not true.

Traveling the state of Ohio and connecting to farmers via cold calls and sales events is the most best professional growth experiences I have ever had, and you cannot put a price tag on that.

 

One of the three PFR tours Stephens organized and led in to London, Ohio

 

PFR tour conducted by Stephens

 

 

News Release: Beal completes internship with Kentucky Expo Center

Beal

Emily Beal, of Conover, recently completed an internship with Kentucky Expo Center in Louisville, Kentucky.

During her internship, Beal was responsible for coordinating horse shows that occurred at the Kentucky Exposition Center, including the World’s Championship Horseshow. She completed tasks ranging from data input to creating a show bill, as well as serving an announcer for the Quarter Horse Show at the Kentucky State Fair.

“The internships our students complete are valuable, hands-on experiences,” said Dr. Annie Specht, program manager and associate professor for agricultural communication. “Not only do they have the opportunity to put the skills they have acquired in their courses into practice, but they also expand their knowledge and create connections by working with professionals in the industry.”

Beal returned to Columbus in August, where she is completing a degree in agricultural communication at The Ohio State University.

The agricultural communication major at Ohio State prepares students to plan, develop, and implement a communication campaign, using visual media, writing and editing. Students study crisis communication, graphic design, marketing, and journalism so they can spread the word about agriculture. To learn more about the agricultural communication major, visit acel.osu.edu or call 614-247-6358.

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News Release: Plahuta completes internship with Ohio Farm to School

Plahuta

Haley Plahuta, of Upper Arlington, recently completed an internship with the Ohio Farm to School program through Ohio State University Extension in Columbus, Ohio.

During her internship, Plahuta promoted the National Farm to Cafetria Conference, which was held in Cincinnati, Ohio, wrote press releases, updated social media and created promotional materials.

“The internships our students complete are valuable, hands-on experiences,” said Dr. Annie Specht, program manager and associate professor for agricultural communication. “Not only do they have the opportunity to put the skills they have acquired in their courses into practice, but they also expand their knowledge and create connections by working with professionals in the industry.”

Plahuta returned to Columbus in August, where she is completing a degree in agricultural communication at The Ohio State University.

The agricultural communication major at Ohio State prepares students to plan, develop, and implement a communication campaign, using visual media, writing and editing. Students study crisis communication, graphic design, marketing, and journalism so they can spread the word about agriculture. To learn more about the agricultural communication major, visit acel.osu.edu or call 614-247-6358.

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News Release: Oglesby completes internship with OSU Extension

Oglesby

Meredith Oglesby, of Hillsboro, recently completed an internship with OSU Extension, Highland County.

During her internship, Oglesby worked to prepare for 4-H camps, summer judging, and the Highland County Fair. She planned Cloverbud Fun Day by creating and designing t-shirts, name badges, and the agenda for the day. She prepared items for the Highland County Fair’s special interest judging and assisted with all office tasks throughout the summer.

“The internships our students complete are valuable, hands-on experiences,” said Dr. Annie Specht, program manager and associate professor for agricultural communication. “Not only do they have the opportunity to put the skills they have acquired in their courses into practice, but they also expand their knowledge and create connections by working with professionals in the industry.”

Oglesby returned to Columbus in August, where she is completing a degree in agricultural communication at The Ohio State University.

The agricultural communication major at Ohio State prepares students to plan, develop, and implement a communication campaign, using visual media, writing and editing. Students study crisis communication, graphic design, marketing, and journalism so they can spread the word about agriculture. To learn more about the agricultural communication major, visit acel.osu.edu or call 614-247-6358.

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News Release: Lininger completes internship with OSU Extension, Marion County

Lininger

Joanna Lininger, of Sycamore, recently completed an internship with OSU Extension, Marion County in Marion, Ohio.

During her internship, Lininger created materials and videos for all extension programs – 4-H youth development, family and consumer sciences and ag and natural resources. She helped with Cloverbud Day Camp and other 4-H camps, assisted at the Marion County Fair, and helped with STEM and Commodity Carnival projects at campus and fair.

“The internships our students complete are valuable, hands-on experiences,” said Dr. Annie Specht, program manager and associate professor for agricultural communication. “Not only do they have the opportunity to put the skills they have acquired in their courses into practice, but they also expand their knowledge and create connections by working with professionals in the industry.”

Lininger returned to Columbus in August, where she is completing a degree in agricultural communication at The Ohio State University.

The agricultural communication major at Ohio State prepares students to plan, develop, and implement a communication campaign, using visual media, writing and editing. Students study crisis communication, graphic design, marketing, and journalism so they can spread the word about agriculture. To learn more about the agricultural communication major, visit acel.osu.edu or call 614-247-6358.

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Oglesby Studies Abroad in Australia

Meredith Oglesby
junior
agricultural communication

During May of 2018 I had the opportunity to travel to Australia on a program called Human Impacts on the Natural Environment. We left on May 7 and arrived to Australia on May 9, the flight from Los Angeles, California to Brisbane, Australia was around 13-14 hours. We then flew to Townsville where we spent the first part of our trip. Australia is fourteen hours ahead of Ohio so it took some time to recover from major jet lag.

Oglesby interacting with wildlife on Magnetic Island

The entire trip was focused on the environment and how Australia maintains a sustainable lifestyle. During our first week in Hidden Valley we were in the rainforest area where we learned about the history of the country and identified flora and fauna. We also spent a day learning about the aboriginals culture at Mungulla Station. We swam in Running River Gorge and hiked to Wallaman Falls, the largest sheer drop waterfall in Australia.

We spent one day in the aquarium in Townsville where we snorkeled and visited a sea turtle rehabilitation center. We then traveled to Magnetic Island where we did a research project on the Koloa population and saw these animals in the wild. They are endemic to Australia, meaning they are only found in this country. We even got to hold one! We also saw other wildlife on the island such as lorikeets and parrots. We also participated in a reef restoration project where we looked at how changing temperatures impacts the plants and life in the ocean.

Our next stop was Mission Beach where we had a free day to sleep in and explore the area. My favorite part of our stay here was when you walked to the beach you had to follow a path through the rainforest first. We weren’t able to swim in the ocean because it was Crocodile season!

Due to the location and size of the country the seasons and weather and very different than the United States during the month of May. This is there fall/winter seasons. For the majority of the trip we were in Northern Queensland where the temperature was in the high 70’s to 80’s. Although near the end of the trip 11 of us traveled to Sydney, which is in the southern part, where the weather was in the low 50’s. I didn’t realize that their weather could be so cold. In some areas in the winter months it will snow near the southern part near Melbourne.

We had the chance to experience the outback while we stayed in Chillagoe. We swam in a local spring fed creek, toured a cave, and learned about why the soil is red as well as how they manage the land with the air and soil being so dry. We also looked into the process of mining. My favorite part of staying in the outback was experiencing the sunsets every evening.

The next section of our trip focused on farming in Australia, with this we had the opportunity to stay with a host family in the Atherton Tablelands. My host family lived on a beef farm. We toured the farm and learned how they manage their farmland with portions of the rainforest being on their property. We also saw a 20 foot python! The family has to watch their livestock and dogs to ensure the snakes do not harm or attack these animals. We also had the chance to make fresh squeezed orange juice. Spending time with the family we learned about their culture and daily life. Much of their lifestyle is similar to Great Britain as they are part of the commonwealth.

We then traveled to Port Douglas where we learned all about the Great Barrier Reef! We had a day to learn about the zoning system that is put into place for businesses and recreational purposes. We also learned how to identify fish and coral species. We spent three days snorkeling on the reef learning all about the impacts humans have on ocean life. We had the chance to see clownfish, sharks, and sea turtles. During our last morning in Port Douglas we did a beach clean-up where we learned about the impacts plastic are having on ocean life.

Also, while in Port Douglas we went to a Wildlife Habitat where we had the chance to see some animals up close. We saw kangaroos, pelicans, crocodiles, and wallabys. My favorite was the cassowary. These are flightless birds similar to what would have been dinosaur species!

We spent our last day as a full group in Cairns where we were able to explore the city after we took our final. We went to the mall and walked on the board walk. This is where part of the group flew home and part of us flew to Sydney for about a day and a half.

While in Sydney the light show Vivid was going on. The whole city is lit up with bright lights and shows and activities. We had the chance to see Sydney Harbor Bridge, the Sydney Opera House. It was really fun to just explore and see the city. We went shopping in some of the stores and saw the different parts of the city.

Sydney light show

On the way back with all the time changes I lived June 8 for 41 hours! Through this trip I was able to learn more about the environment and ways to be more environmentally friendly. I also gain valuable friendships with people I wouldn’t have met if it wasn’t for this trip. I am so thankful for the adventures I had every day and won’t forget them anytime soon!

Wallaman Falls

Sunset in the Outback

 

Oglesby (second from left) and her friends with their host mom