Alumni Spotlight: Allison Cooper, ’12, ’14 MS

[ACEL]: Hi Allison! Why did you select agriculture and extension education as your major?
[Cooper]: I selected a major in Agriculture and Extension Education because extension was a huge part of my life growing up in 4-H and I wanted to give back to my home community in the same ways that molded me into the person I am. I personally feel that 4-H is an amazing program that has so much to offer ANY youth. From livestock to STEM, the opportunities are endless and so many life skills can be gained through hands on learning experiences.

Why did you choose to attend The Ohio State University?
I actually started my schooling at another university and had no idea what I wanted to do with my life. After some soul searching and realistic planning, I found that The Ohio State University offered a degree in Extension Education and it was all scarlet and gray from there. After graduating with my bachelors, I jumped right back into being a Buckeye to finish my Master of Science.

How did your education at Ohio State influence your choice of career or your career path?
Being a student at The Ohio State University allowed me to participate in early field experiences and even an internship that only reinforced my decision to become a 4-H Educator.

What were you involved in as an Ohio State student (student organizations, honoraries, campus jobs, Greek life, etc.):
By the time I transferred to Ohio State, I was a Junior so entering into student organizations was a little intimidating as most students had been involved since freshman. However I was welcomed with open arms to a few of the campus student organization groups and really enjoyed getting to meet so many people; some of whom I still keep in contact with today.

What classes did you enjoy the most while at Ohio State? What was your favorite and why?
My favorite class while attending The Ohio State University would have been AEE 530.01: Methods of Teaching; Non-Formal with Dr. Susie Whittington. Although this class was geared more toward the classroom education for future Agriculture teachers, it really helped me develop my way of creating a non-formal lesson plan that could be applied to a variety of education environments. The class really made you think into the beyond of what was happening and instead focus on all that could happen and how the educator could prepare. I still use Dr. Whittington’s lesson plan model, although slightly adapted, for my 4-H camp counselors when they plan their teaching activities for our county 4-H Camp.

What professor, faculty or staff member had an impact on your education/career? How?
I truly think all of my professors in the College of Ag impacted me in some way and gave me the confidence to keep going down the path to extension. Even now, I still see some of them occasionally who still remember me, ask me about my job, and how my life is going. I know I never would have made it through, especially in graduate school, without their support, encouragement, and understanding. I apologize as I’m sure I’ll miss a few, but a huge thank you goes out to Dr. Graham Cochran, Dr. Jeff King, Dr. Scott Scheer, Jerry Thomas, and Dr. Susie Whittington for helping me get where I am today!

What is your favorite memory related to your time at Ohio State?
One of my favorite memories from my time at Ohio State was attending my first football game in the shoe. My best friend Kelly and I were all dressed up and ready to be a part of the student section. The thrill and excitement was just overwhelming and the atmosphere is something that you have to be part of to truly understand. I’ve been back to many games since but I often find myself wanting to be a part of the student section again and feel that sense of pride to be a Buckeye student. Go Bucks!

What was your first job following your education at Ohio State?
After graduating with my bachelors, I received a job as a teller at one of our local financial institutions. It really was a wonderful job that allowed me to continue my studies. The staff at Peoples Saving and Loan really encouraged me to finish my school work and was always willing to work with me as I completed my degree and worked towards a new job.

For what schools, companies and/or organizations have you worked throughout your career?
Once I received my Masters degree, I was hired as the 4-H Youth Development Extension Educator in Crawford County. I have been in that position for almost three years now and I’m excited for many more great years ahead.

What advice would you give to a current student?
My advice to any college student would be to appreciate your time in school and get as much as you can out of every experience. It may not seem like it but the people you meet in college can be a big part of your life in the future. Even now I see fellow classmates, student organization members, my old roomates, and other people from OSU in my line of work and it’s great to already have a networking connection with them. The real world starts all to soon after college and as students we are so busy looking forward that we sometimes forget to take in the here and now. Get involved. Met new friends. Make memories that will last a lifetime.

 

 

 

 

 

Industry in the News

Education

Idaho high school re-starts its ag education program after 50-year pause

Agriculture Education Attracting A Different Demographic

Communication

Trust In Food Q&A: Michele Payn On Consumer Mistrust Of Agriculture

Agriculture Industry Working To Build Relationships With The Public

Community

Imported Oranges Expected to Surpass Florida Citrus Growers

Gov. Cuomo announces $1.25 million in farm grants

Leadership

Congratulations to FFA on 90th Convention & Expo!

Colorado Agricultural Leadership Foundation recognized for education, conservation work in Douglas County

Industry

Schneider: Indiana is ideal for agricultural diversity

California Wildfires Leave Seasonal Agricultural Workers In Limbo

 

 

 

ACEL Weekly Update – October 26, 2017

Upcoming Events
October 31 – Agricultural Education Society Meeting, 7pm, Ag Admin Auditorium
November 1 – Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow meeting, 6pm, Ag Admin 205
November 14 – Agricultural Education Society Meeting, 7pm, Ag Admin Auditorium
November 15 – Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow meeting, 6pm, Ag Admin 205
November 28 – Agricultural Education Society Meeting, 7pm, Ag Admin Auditorium
December 6 – Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow meeting, 6pm, Ag Admin 205

News
On our website

On our Blog

ACEL In the News

Thomas Shaw, agricultural communication student, Ohio State genetics event aims to combat myths about ‘Franken-food’, Columbus Dispatch

ACEL Centennial Shirts
Agricultural Education Society is selling t-shirts and sweatshirts to celebrate the ACEL Centennial. Shirts are heather red with the white centennial logo on the front. T-shirts ($15)  can be purchased at any Agricultural Education Society Meeting or in 208 Agricultural Administration.

ACEL Centennial Sweatshirts
SWEATSHIRTS ARE IN! If you placed an order with Agricultural Education Society to order an ACEL Centennial sweatshirt, you can pick it up in 208 next week!

ACEL looking for students to guest post on social media
We are looking for students who would like to “takeover” our snapchat (ACELatOhioState) or Instagram (@ACELatOSU) accounts for a day. Students can share a typical day on campus, as well as guest posters for special events and topics. If you are interested in being a guest poster and sharing Ohio State with our followers, please sign up at this website.

Become an ACEL student blogger
We are looking for students to guest post on our blog (u.osu.edu/acel). Blog topics can include an overview of your internship, a summary of your favorite class, a student abroad or student organization trip recap, tips for incoming students, a feature on decorating your residence hall room, and so much more! You can blog just once, or write a series to be shared over time! If you are interested, please emailEmily Wickham to discus details!

Scholarships

Check back next week!

Education Abroad
SUMMER 2018 PROGRAMS:
Australia: Sustaining Human Societies and the Environment – ENR (May 7 – June 1, 2018)
Application Deadline: January 15, 2018
Information Sessions: Thursday, October 26, 2017, 4:30-5:30 pm, Hitchcock Hall 250; Wednesday, November 15, 2017, 5:30 – 6:30 pm, Kottman Hall 102

China: Ag. Energy and Environment and Sustainable Buildings: China-US Collaborations – FABE (June 8 – July 1, 2018)
Application Deadline: January 3rd, 2018

Czech Republic: Sustainability and Agricultural Policy in the EU – AEDE, FAES (May11 – June 9, 2018)
Application Deadline: February 1, 2018

England: Evolution in Darwin’s World and Ours – Entomology (May 2-14, 2018)
Application Deadline: November 1, 2017

Ghana: Arts and Community Development (Ohio State ATI) – FAES (May 3 – June 3, 2018)
Application Deadline: November 1, 2017

India: Sustainable Food Production in an Emerging Economy – FABE – (May – June, 2018)
Application Deadline: January 3rd, 2018

New Zealand: Sustaining Human Societies and the Environment – ENR (May 7 – June 1, 2018)
Application Deadline: January 15, 2018
Information Sessions: Monday, November 13, 2017, 5:00 – 6:00 pm, MacQuigg Lab 162

South Africa: Exotic Animal Behavior and Welfare – Animal Sciences (Two Sections: May 5 – 22, and May 26 – June 12, 2018)
Application Deadline: November 1, 2017

Tanzania: Sustainable and Resilient Tanzanian Community – ENR (May 9 – 31, 2018)
Application Deadline: November 1, 2017

Internship and Job Opportunities
Internship Openings

AgriBeef Co – Marketing Intern/E-Commerce
AgroFresh Inc. – Marketing Communications Intern
Certified Angus Beef – Producer Communications Intern

Full-Time Job Openings
Case Western Reserve – Assistant Director, Government and Community Relations
Cincinnati Museum Center & National Underground Railroad Museum – Coordinator of Membership
City of Covington, Kentucky – Public Information Officer
Cleveland Museum of Natural History – Development Engagement & Programming Manager
Girl Scouts of Ohio’s Heartland – Graphic Designer
Green Circle Growers – Content Manager/Copywriter
John Carroll University – Director of External Relations
National FFA – Regional Director Corporate Development
Northern Kentucky University – Asst. Professor in Organizational Leadership
Ohio Basement Authority – Graphic Design Specialist
Ohio State, Athletics – Interactive Graphic Designer
St. Joseph Orphanage – Development & Communications Coordinator
University of Minnesota – Recruitment and Communications Coordinator, Ag Ed and Ag Comm
Western Reserve Historical Society – Development Coordinator

Extension and Teaching Jobs

Ohio Ag Ed Openings

Alumni Spotlight: Tim Massie ’78

[ACEL]: Hi Tim! Why did you select your major?
[Massie]: I selected an Ag Education major based upon the recommendation from an acquaintance who at the time was a graduate student working as an academic advisor.

Why did you choose to attend The Ohio State University?
When I was considering my career path after high school my goal was to become a veterinarian.  I always wanted to attend The Ohio State University and since they offered this opportunity it was a perfect fit for me.

How did your education at Ohio State influence your choice of career or your career path?
As my education at The Ohio State University proceeded quarter after quarter I knew that I wanted to become a vocational agriculture instructor.  I found the courses required to complete my degree in Ag Education to be interesting and increased my desire to continue this path to my new goal.

What were you involved in as an Ohio State student (student organizations, honoraries, campus jobs, Greek life, etc.):
As an Ohio State student I was involved in a fraternity for four years serving as the treasurer one year and I participating in several intramural sports as a fraternity member.   I also attended University 4-H club meetings and Ag Ed Society meetings.

What classes did you enjoy the most while at Ohio State? What was your favorite and why?
My most enjoyable and favorite classes were the Ag Education classes because they were the most practical classes which would eventually help me towards my career path.  I especially enjoyed classes in which the professor conducted the class as you would if you were the teacher of a high school class.  If a student was late coming to class he would treat the situation as you should if you were the teacher in the classroom.  He instructed us on many other elements we may deal with in the classroom and we took turns role playing situations.  All of these activities I found very useful when I became employed as a vocational agriculture instructor.

What professor, faculty or staff member had an impact on your education?
Roger Smith, the graduate student who was working as an academic advisor at the time, was the person who suggested that I look into the Ag Education pathway.  It was a career path that I had never considered previously and shortly after beginning that pathway I knew that is what I wanted to do.

What is your favorite memory related to your time at Ohio State?
My favorite memory at Ohio State was the entire college experience.  When I enrolled at The Ohio State University, I was pretty green.  Throughout my college experience I learned to budget my time and money, to prioritize my tasks/assignments, and it is where I began to develop my organizational skills.  All of these skills I continue to use today almost forty years later.  Of course there is nothing like being a Buckeye at The Ohio State University and experiencing all the excitement of a game day!

What was your first job following your education at Ohio State?
After graduating from The Ohio State University my first job was a high school vocational agriculture instructor.

For what schools and organizations have you worked throughout your career?
I was employed by the Gallipolis City School system and I worked at the Gallia Academy High School for thirty-five years.  For the first thirteen years I worked as the vocational agriculture instructor, three years as guidance counselor, sixteen years as the assistant principal, and the last three years as the high school principal.

I have been elected as a director for the Gallia County Agricultural Society since 1980 (37 years to date).  During my service I was elected as treasurer for three years, president for five years, and I have been elected and currently serve as secretary for the last twenty-nine years.  I was also elected to the Ohio Fair Managers Association Board in 1994 and served as a district director for ten years, second vice-president two years, first vice-president two years, and president two years.

Another one of my favorite jobs is working as an Ohio State Patrol Auxiliary Officer for over eleven years and I have held the ranks of Officer, Sergeant, Lieutenant, Captain, and I currently serve as Major.

During your career, what awards have you received?
In October 1990 I was inducted into the Gallia County 4-H Hall of Fame.  In May of 1996 I was awarded the Honorary Chapter FFA Degree.  In 1997, I was awarded the Ohio Fair Manager’s Association Director of the year by the Greater Ohio Showmen’s Association.  In January 2009 I was recognized by the Ohio Fair Manager’s Association and the Greater Ohio Showmen’s Association for serving as president of the OFMA.

On May 31, 2013 the Gallia County Commissioners proclaimed this day as Timothy Massie Day for my influence on the youth of Gallia County.

As of today, what is your favorite career highlight?
My favorite career highlight for thirty-five years was working with all the students that went through Gallia Academy High School in all my capacities.  It is very rewarding watching them grow, learn, mature and seeing them walk across the stage on graduation evening.

What advice would you give to a current student?
Current students should select a career path that will help them secure a career they will enjoy doing each and every day.  You must keep in mind that no matter what career you choose, you are going to experience good days and bad days, so you must learn to take the good with the bad.  Hopefully the good will outnumber the bad!  I would encourage them to get active in any related organizations offered at OSU to build relationships and friendships that may be useful in the future.  Finally I would like to pass along some advice that one of my school superintendents gave to each of the graduating classes he addressed during graduation.  Supt. Jack W. Payton would tell the graduating class members as part of his yearly address something like this:  “Be on time, doing your job to the best of your ability.”

 

Alumni Spotlight: Scott Sharp ’92

[ACEL]: Hi Scott!Why did you select your major?
[Sharp]: I chose agricultural education because I grew up on a farm and I always loved helping out and being involved in agriculture.  Once I got to high school and began taking agriculture classes, I realized I could join my love of agriculture and my passion of working with kids together.

Why did you choose to attend The Ohio State University?
I chose to attend The Ohio State University because both my mom and my dad had gone to Ohio State and I had grown up going to Ohio State football games as a kid.  I attended my first Ohio State vs. Michigan game when I was 10 years old in 1980.  Also my Dad had made the OSU football team in 1965 under Woody Hayes and I wanted to try and do the same myself.  I was on the OSU football team from 1988 to 1990 under Coach John Cooper. Finally, and probably the most important reason, was I wanted to become an agricultural educator and OSU is where I wanted to earn my degree to accomplish this goal.

How did your education at Ohio State influence your choice of career or your career path?
I know that with an agricultural education degree it is certainly possible to follow many different career paths.  However, I have always loved working with kids and also with agriculture.  With my agricultural education this allowed me to do both.

You were on the football team, did this leave time for you to be involved in any other student life activities?
I was on the football team for three years – 1988, 1989 and 1990.  This pretty much required my full attention and really didn’t leave much time for anything else.

What classes did you enjoy the most while at Ohio State? What was your favorite and why?
I loved my agriculture classes and also history.  I took several history electives while at OSU and really enjoyed all of them.  I now have a master of social science degree as well as my B.S. in agricultural education.  My two favorite classes were my welding class with Dr. Paperiton and my American military policy class with Dr. Millett.  Agriculture and history have always been my passions.

Did you have a faculty member or advisor who played an especially important role to you as a student?
Dr. Cano and Dr. Barrick both had the most impact on my educational career.  Without their guidance and counseling I’m pretty sure I would not be where I am at today.  

What is your favorite memory related to your time at Ohio State?
The memory that comes to mind quickest was the first home OSU football game and being in the locker room waiting to go out onto the field and hearing the noise of the crowd get louder and louder as game time got closer.  It was a really tight crush of all the players out of the locker room and then out across the end zone.  I was so scared to not fall as we were going out of the locker room and onto the field that I never looked up until I was about half way across the end zone, and then WOW!  100,000 people all cheering and the stadium full of fans and the noise.  I’ll never forget it.  Amazing!  

What was your first job following your education at Ohio State?
My wife and I both worked at the Owens Corning Tech Center in Granville Ohio as lab technicians before each of us got our first jobs in the agricultural education and extension fields.

Share the different positions you’ve had throughout your career.
I have taught for the Amanda-Clearcreek High School for the last 24 years.  Before that I worked as a substitute teacher for the Henry County Schools.  I also worked at a grain elevator before that and also for the Owens Corning Tech Center as a lab technician.

During your career, have you received any awards or honors?
I’ve never really put much stock in personal awards.  I’ve earned a few over the years, but I would much rather prefer to have my students be successful and earn awards through their hard work and dedication than for me to get any kind of personal awards.

As of today, what is your favorite career highlight?
The best two days of my career were a few years ago when I had three students win the State public speaking CDE and my fourth student was in the top ten finalists, all on the same day.  We literally won three of the four categories in the contest.  The second highlight day of my career was when two of those same students went on the next fall to place second and third in the nation in the Prepared and Extemporaneous speaking categories at the national contest, again both on the same day.  I’m not sure if this has ever been done before but it was certainly a great day to remember.

What advice would you give to a current student?
Be patient.  Work hard and do things the right way.  If it’s worth doing, it’s worth doing well.

What did ACEL cultivate in you? How?
Energy, passion and a desire to be the best teacher I can possibly be.  Also to never stop learning and improving on your career.

 


 

 

 

 

Industry in the News

Education

#WorldFoodDay: Investing in agricultural education can help feed future populations

‘Ag in the Classroom’ teaches students importance of agriculture

Communication

Smith-Hughes Act celebrates centennial

2018 Farm Bureau YAP Winter Leadership Conference coming up

Community

Study lauds Ohio farmers for impact on Lake Erie

Time for the 2017 National FFA Convention

Leadership

From 4-H’er to 4-H leader

Ohio’s Senate Ag Committee Chair Cliff Hite resigns

Industry 

Ohio ranks high for number of organic farms

5 things to know about Wagyu beef

 

 

 

ACEL Weekly Update – October 18, 2017

Upcoming Events
October 18 – Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow meeting, 5:30pm, Ag Admin 205
October 31 – Agricultural Education Society Meeting, 7pm, Ag Admin Auditorium
November 1 – Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow meeting, 6pm, Ag Admin 205
November 14 – Agricultural Education Society Meeting, 7pm, Ag Admin Auditorium
November 15 – Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow meeting, 6pm, Ag Admin 205
November 28 – Agricultural Education Society Meeting, 7pm, Ag Admin Auditorium
December 6 – Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow meeting, 6pm, Ag Admin 205

News
On our website

On our Blog

ACEL In the News

Roger Rennekamp, alum ’87, Two-day conference to focus on advancing health and wellnessOhio State News
Mark Landefeld, ’01, When is the best time to sell cull cows?Beef Magazine
Bob Buxton, alum, ’71, ’91, Ozarck Fall armfest brings record crowdsFarm Talk Newspaper
Scott Sharp, alum ’92, Joy Sharp, ’92, ’96, Newborn calf makes Fairfield County Fair debutLancaster Eagle-Gazette
Taylor Lutz, Cody Myers, Gage Smith, agriscience education students, ATI students make OSU Homecoming court floral arrangementsWooster Daily Record
Department of Agricultural Communication, Education, and LeadershipSmith-Hughes Act celebrates centennial, Farm and Dairy

ACEL Centennial Shirts
Agricultural Education Society is selling t-shirts and sweatshirts to celebrate the ACEL Centennial. Shirts are heather red with the white centennial logo on the front. T-shirts ($15)  can be purchased at any Agricultural Education Society Meeting or in 208 Agricultural Administration.

ACEL Centennial Sweatshirts
SWEATSHIRTS ARE IN! If you placed an order with Agricultural Education Society to order an ACEL Centennial sweatshirt, you can pick it up in 208 next week!

ACEL looking for students to guest post on social media
We are looking for students who would like to “takeover” our snapchat (ACELatOhioState) or Instagram (@ACELatOSU) accounts for a day. Students can share a typical day on campus, as well as guest posters for special events and topics. If you are interested in being a guest poster and sharing Ohio State with our followers, please sign up at this website.

Become an ACEL student blogger
We are looking for students to guest post on our blog (u.osu.edu/acel). Blog topics can include an overview of your internship, a summary of your favorite class, a student abroad or student organization trip recap, tips for incoming students, a feature on decorating your residence hall room, and so much more! You can blog just once, or write a series to be shared over time! If you are interested, please emailEmily Wickham to discus details!

National FFA Convention Letter of Intent Signing
Do you know someone planning to become an agricultural educator?
The Letter of Intent Signing event is an opportunity for students at the National FFA Convention and Expo to declare their future as an agriculture teacher! The signing event is open to high school seniors planning to major in agricultural education and teach agriculture as a career, or current college students transferring to study agricultural education.Follow this link for more information and to sign up today!  Please direct any questions to Elisa Russ, the National Teach Ag Campaign Intern, at emruss@iastate.edu.Visit the CASE Booth at National FFA Convention!
CASE will be located at booth #4727 in Teacher’s World. Visit the CASE booth to learn about current and upcoming CASE courses, CASE Online, Lead Teacher opportunities for 2018, and much more. CASE will also have the most up-to-date listing of 2018 CASE Institute dates and locations posted at the booth.

CASE certified teachers who visit the booth will receive a CASE window cling and 2018 CASE Institute pocket schedule, while supplies last! The CASE VIP Lounge will have seating reserved for CASE certified teachers to catch up with colleagues or rest their feet. Be sure to connect with CASE affiliate institutions, sponsors, and partners who will be recognized across the FFA Expo with special banners.

Military Virtual Career Fair – AgCareers.com
Event to connect agricultural employers and job seekers that is open to all Veterans, Active-Duty Military, and Military Spouses on November 9, 2017
AgCareers.com is hosting a virtual career fair exclusively for military veterans and professionals seeking employment in agriculture. This is a unique opportunity to take your job search to the next level by connecting one-on-one with employers in real time! Learn more and register now here.

Save the Date: Global Food Security Symposium 2018
Mark your calendars for the 2018 Global Food Security Symposium March 21 and 22, 2018 in Washington, DC! In the meantime, we’re working on a major report exploring how to engage youth in low income countries and rural areas to spur creativity and productivity that leads to prosperity.Do you know of a student who is interested in shaping new ideas for food security and agricultural development? 
Encourage them to apply now to join the 2018 Next Generation Student Delegation! Selected students’ travel to and accommodations in Washington DC are covered, and they enjoy the opportunity to engage in symposium discussions and interact with global leaders working on agriculture, food, and nutrition issues. Learn more about last year’s Next Generation Student Delegation. Applications are due on or before Sunday November, 5. Questions about the application process? Please contact  nextgendelegation@thechicagocouncil.org.

Scholarships

Check back next week!

Education Abroad
SUMMER 2018 PROGRAMS:
Australia: Sustaining Human Societies and the Environment – ENR (May 7 – June 1, 2018)
Application Deadline: January 15, 2018
Information Sessions: Thursday, October 26, 2017, 4:30-5:30 pm, Hitchcock Hall 250; Wednesday, November 15, 2017, 5:30 – 6:30 pm, Kottman Hall 102

China: Ag. Energy and Environment and Sustainable Buildings: China-US Collaborations – FABE (June 8 – July 1, 2018)
Application Deadline: January 3rd, 2018

Czech Republic: Sustainability and Agricultural Policy in the EU – AEDE, FAES (May11 – June 9, 2018)
Application Deadline: February 1, 2018

England: Evolution in Darwin’s World and Ours – Entomology (May 2-14, 2018)
Application Deadline: November 1, 2017

Ghana: Arts and Community Development (Ohio State ATI) – FAES (May 3 – June 3, 2018)
Application Deadline: November 1, 2017

India: Sustainable Food Production in an Emerging Economy – FABE – (May – June, 2018)
Application Deadline: January 3rd, 2018

New Zealand: Sustaining Human Societies and the Environment – ENR (May 7 – June 1, 2018)
Application Deadline: January 15, 2018
Information Sessions: Wednesday, October 25, 2017, 5:30 – 6:30 pm, Kottman Hall 102; Monday, November 13, 2017, 5:00 – 6:00 pm, MacQuigg Lab 162

South Africa: Exotic Animal Behavior and Welfare – Animal Sciences (Two Sections: May 5 – 22, and May 26 – June 12, 2018)
Application Deadline: November 1, 2017

Tanzania: Sustainable and Resilient Tanzanian Community – ENR (May 9 – 31, 2018)
Application Deadline: November 1, 2017
Information Sessions: Monday, October 16, 2017, 5:00 – 6:00 pm, Mendenhall Lab 129

Internship and Job Opportunities
Internship Openings

AgriBeef Co. – Marketing Intern/E-Commerce
Bader Rutter – Agriculture Marketing Communications Summer ’18 Internship
Bader Rutter – Ag PR/Social Media Summer Internship
CHS Inc. – Intern: Marketing Communications (Summer)
DuPont – 2018 Management Leadership Development Program Internship
Farm Credit Mid-America – Intern-Government and Legislative Affairs
Filament Marketing – Marketing Communications Intern (Summer 2018)
FLM – Communications Intern
Food for the Hungry – Public Policy Intern
Lallemand Animal Nutrition – Marketing and Communication Internship
National Farm to school Network – Conference Intern
National Farm to school Network – Development Intern
Nebraska Corn Board – Communication Internship
Osborn & Barr Communications – 2018 Summer Internship
The Wonderful Company LLC – Marketing and Communications Intern
Tomahawk Power – Marketing Intern
The Climate Corporation – Intern: Agricultural Meteorologist
The Mosaic Company – Public Affairs Co-Op/Intern
United Producers, Inc. – Communication Internship (Updated info,  time frame)
University of Mississippi – Social Media Intern
Women for Women – Program Intern
Women for Women – Fundraising Events Intern
Women on Work – Marketing Intern

Apply for the 2018 Teach Ag Intern Position!
The intern position will start in May 2018 and the end date will depend on performance, but may last until April 2019. The intern will be stationed out of the NAAE office, located on the University of Kentucky campus, in Lexington, KY for eight weeks during the summer. The remainder of the internship will completed remotely. Applications are due by Sunday, January 7th, 2018. Click here for more information and to apply.

Full-Time Job Openings
American Crafts – Graphic Designer
Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute – International Marketing Coordinator
BASF Corporation – Communications Analyst
Case Western Reserve University – Marketing & Communications Coordinator
City of Austin, Texas – Conservation Program Coordinator
Cornell University – Temporary Videographer / Video Editor
Cornell University – Energy Educator
Cracked Pots – Communications Coordinator
Delta Gamma Fraternity – Assistant Director of Events and Operations
Earth Mama – Graphic Designer, Social Media Lead
Farm Bureau Financial Services – Young Farmer & Leadership Intern
Farm Bureau Insurance – Corporate Communications Coordinator
Forbes Media – Summer 2018 Editorial Internship Program
Franklin County Farm Bureau – Marketing & Media Associate
Girl Scouts of Ohio’s Heartland – Senior Manager, Graphic Design
Godman Guild – Adult and Community Education Director
Greater Twin Cities United Way – Area Programs Coordinator
Greenacres Foundation – Agriculture Education Director
Habitat for Humanity MidOhio –ReStore Volunteer Coordinator
Harry R. Hughes Center for Agro-Ecology, Inc. – Communications Coordinator
High Quality Organics – Social Media Marketing Coordinator
Hispanic Scholarship Fund – Manger, Marketing and Communications
Idaho Wheat Commission – Communications and Grower Education Manager
Marco Services – Marketing Communications Coordinator
Mansfield Area YMCA – Program Intern (Winter)
Milwaukee Art Museum – Graphic Designer
National Association of State Foresters – Communications Director
National FFA Organization – State Officer Leadership Programs Facilitators
National FFA Organization – 2018 Washington Leadership Conference Facilitators
National FFA Organization – 2018 Washington Leadership Conference Director
North Carolina State Extension – Extension Agent, Agriculture
North Carolina, Natural and Cultural Resources – Director of Public Affairs
Ohio State, Mansfield – Admissions Counselor
Ohio State, EHE – Coordinator, Development Events
Ohio Suicide Prevention Foundation –Grant Project Coordinator
Queen City Harley-Davidson –Marketing and Events Coordinator
Rhodes State College – Director of Marketing and College Relations
Ruffle Butts – Social Media Rockstar
Southern Environmental Law Center – Writer, Development and Marketing
Teacher Retirement of Texas – Director of Communications
Texas A&M – Assistant or Association Professor
University of California, Davis – COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT COORDINATOR
University of Maryland, Agro-Ecology Center – Communications Coordinator
University of Stanford – Communications Manager, Natural Capital Project
University of Wisconsin- Platteville – Social Media Manager
Virginia Farm Bureau – Commodities Support Specialist
Washington FFA Foundation – Executive Director
Washington Office for Latin America – Communications Assistant

NAAE Communications/Marketing Coordinator Position Available 
We are looking for qualified applicants for the position of Communications/Marketing Coordinator. For more information and to apply, please follow this link.

Extension and Teaching Jobs

Ohio Ag Ed Openings

North Carolina Ag Ed Openings
Texas Ag Ed Openings
New Mexico Ag Ed Openings
Colorado Ag Ed Openings
Arkansas Ag Ed Openings
Pennsylvania Ag Ed Openings
Michigan Ag Ed Openings
Indiana Ag Ed Openings
Tennessee Ag Ed Openings

Graduate School
Arizona State University
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Volunteer Opportunity with National Farm to Cafeteria Conference
We are searching for an OSU student who has a passion for healthy local foods being served in cafeterias across the nation. OSU Extension Ohio Farm to School is seeking a student willing to volunteer and serve on the local planning committee for the National Farm to Cafeteria Conference to be held April 25-27 in Cincinnati, OH. Your talents will be used and it’s a great way to build your resume and network in local foods. For your service to the committee you will reserve free conference registration. Contact Amy Fovargue at 740-398-8397 or Fovargue.1@osu.edu.

Alumni Spotlight: Ed Boutwell ’68

My name is Ed Boutwell.  I was born on January 25, 1943 at home (common in those days) near the small Wyandot County village of Wharton, Ohio.  I grew up on a general livestock & grain farm, the son of tenant farmers attending Salem High School.

I was very active in basketball, baseball and the Future Farmers of America, hunting, fishing plus “carrying my share of the farm labor”. The year I was a senior, Salem, Harpster and Marseilles annexed into the Upper Sandusky district so my diploma is through Upper.  Six weeks before graduation, Mr. John Borton, my senior agricultlure teacher, hired several FFA members to clean the manure out of his Angus cattle barn. The next Monday, I asked him what I would have to do to be an agriculture teacher. I will never forget his advice — be enthused about agriculture, rank God, family and teaching in that order and above all love kids.

When I graduated from Upper in 1961, Ohio State was the only place to get a degree to teach agriculture, so the university decision was easy.  As our farm was only 24 miles from the Marion OSU branch, I attended there for 2.5 years.  I also worked at a plastic factory, trained horses and helped dad some on the farm.

On March 21, 1964 I married my wife of 53 years, Diana Rose Kennedy. We moved to Columbus, Ohio to complete my degree. Our son, Rob, was born in January of my senior year. While at main campus, I worked at Dixie Margarine, UPS, OSU Meat Lab and the OSU horse barn.  On campus, I joined the Agricultural Education Society.

The most memorable moment as a senior was carrying the United States flag into the arena at the opening of the “Little International” livestock show — a duty awarded to the head barn boy.  At practice the mare stood rock solid for the nation anthem, BUT at night with the spot light on us, she side stepped the whole time — I could not get her to stand.

My most enjoyable class and professor was nutrition under Dr. Tizniz. He made nutrition interesting and important. He also gave the most thought provoking quiz I had ever seen. We were studying minerals and all 10 questions were answered correctly by calcium. Believe me by the 8th or 9th question, we were wondering if he could possibly ask another question about calcium.

I remember the 1967 football season was so cold, rainy and bad, Diana was pregnant with our son, so she did not want to attend, and I could not even GIVE THE TICKETS AWAY.  Then in 1968, WE WON THE NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP.

In the spring of 1968, I interviewed at Southeastern (Ross) and Lakota, choosing Southeastern.  Can you imagine having my name on the contract in May and not graduating until June!  It is a fact — impossible in today’s educational system!

I taught nine years at Southeastern, awaking a “sleepy” community and FFA.  During this time, we crop shared a 68 acre farm for its disabled owner, conducted the Ohio State Fair nursery for the Ag. Ed. department and developed nine state farmers.  Our second child, a girl, Dawn, was born in 1971.

Ross Landmark hired me away to sell seed, feed and fertilizer for them. Many might think this was a wasted 2 years, but I learned so much about new technology and large scale operations, that I was a better teacher because of it. Also in 1977 our 3rd child, another girl, Olivia, was born.

My general manager approached me in the spring of 1977, stating that because of donating to the Ohio FFA Foundation, he had to tickets to the state FFA banquet; would my wife and I represent the company? I remember vividly as we pulled of 71 on to 17th avenue, my wife looking in the back seat and said “it seems funny to go in here with no “blue jackets” in the back.  I was so taken back that I contacted Mr. John Watkins (district supervisor) and found that Carey and River Valley were both open.  I chose Carey and they chose me.

20 years at Carey flew by — I was back in my home county!  Carey FFA conducted the “Bob Evan’s Baby Animal Barnyard” at the Ohio State Fair for 10 years, and in 1995, I was appointed to the Ohio State Fair rabbit show committee to represent the FFA. Carey FFA won or placed well in many soil, small engine and tractor trouble shooting contests. One thing I am very proud of is the many state and american farmers that I have coached, ALL MADE THE DEGREES HONESTLY — no “paper tigers”.

I have been honored to serve on 2 fair boards — Ross County for 5 years and Wyandot County for 15 years.

I retired on July 1, 1999 with 29 years in the class room plus buying some time at OSU.  In retirement I drove bus and limo plus working in my shop.  I also expanded the kennel and rabbit operation.

Late spring of 2003 I received a call from the FFA booster’s president of Riverdale asking me to apply there, I did, and taught 5 more years.  This was my first assignment with a NEW school.  What a change of environment. We had some sharp members with two state farmers that received the American Degree the year after I re-retired. The Riverdale FFA received the State FFA “Top % Membership  Gain Award” in 2006. I re-retired on July 1, 2008.

Back home and lots of time, right — RIGHT!  We closed the kennel in 2007 — we had raised, trained and boarded Dobermans, German Shepherds and Rottweilers for over 40 years. We had sold a German Shepherd to the Air Force for a bomb dog and a Doberman puppy went to Saudi Arabia for palace security. With both knees replaced and the fences failing, it was time.  However the New Zealand rabbit business was really hopping.  Our reputation for quality meat pen rabbits grew to selling in nine or 10 counties per year, even into Michigan.

The Wyandot County Farm Bureau surprised me on August 19, 2012 with the “Distinguished Service Award”.

So much for loafing.  Three weeks before school started in 2014, a call came from the Arlington FFA Alumni president… “We don’t have any applicants! Will you please be our Agriculture teacher this year?” Another year in the classroom (a total of 35) and I am now done for real.

My advice to current students is to repeat what Mr. John Borton advised me — “be enthused about agriculture, rank God, family and teaching in that order  — and above all love kids”.

In re-re-retirement, I plan on fishing with and teaching my two grand-daughters to be responsible hunters and gun handlers, travel over Ohio with Diana visiting with my former students.

Baiting “Keesha” our school patrol dog several years ago, 1980

 

The younger “slimmer” days at Southeastern, 1973.

 

Supporting the FFA Alumni with Ag Ed 1 and FFA 1.

 

Supporting the FFA Alumni with Ag Ed 1 and FFA 1

 

Olivia, Dawn, Rob and I with our FFA jackets at the 2008 banquet at Riverdale.

 

Family photo on the day of graduation

 

Diana and I in our trailer at Christmas 1966

Alumni Spotlight: Morgan Large ’12

[ACEL]: Hi Morgan! Why did you select your major?
[Large]: I grew up on a farm in southeast Ohio where we raised sheep & hay/grain. After looking into my skillset and considering different career paths, I decided agricultural communications and animal sciences were the right courses of study for me to take my agriculture background and make it into a career.

Why did you choose to attend The Ohio State University?
I always thought I was meant to be a Buckeye. People often mentioned how big the campus and student body was or how far from home I would be. However, to me it was always home. The size of the campus and the distance from my family were never a concern to me. With my background in agriculture and Ohio State’s land grant mission, the decision was easy when the time came to choose where I wanted to spend the next four years. I am even more proud to be the first member of my family to have graduated from The Ohio State University.

How did your education at Ohio State influence your choice of career or your career path?
At Ohio State, the skills we learned were diverse and easily applied to any career. The ACEL department specifically provided me with the tools to be successful in any career. Although I am not directly involved in the agriculture industry with my current position, I do work with clients on a regularly basis that have ties to agriculture.

What were you involved in as an Ohio State student (student organizations, honoraries, campus jobs, Greek life, etc.):
I was an active member of Sigma Alpha Professional Agricultural Sorority, Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow, Towers Agricultural Honorary, CFAES Banquet Planning Committee and Scarlet & Gray Ag Day Co-Chair & Planning Committee. I also participated in two study abroad courses (CFAES inaugural First Year Experience to Mexico and Human & Animal Interactions to New Zealand).

What classes did you enjoy the most while at Ohio State?
What was your favorite and why? I really enjoyed Dr. Zerby’s Animal Products class because it was fun to learn so many facts about animals beyond meat science. Also, Tom Stewart’s classes in the ACEL department were probably my favorite because he developed a welcoming and enjoyable learning environment. He also had the added experience of working in the industry at WBNS TV and the academic prowess as well.

What professor, faculty or staff member had an impact on your education/career? How?
I would have to say ACEL’s own, Emily Buck, was most influential to my education and ultimately, my career. She believed in me and helped guide me throughout my 4 years at Ohio State. Whenever I had a question or just needed to talk, she was there, and coming in as a freshman, she was that familiar face that made me feel at ease while adjusting to campus life. I remember meeting with her about graduate schools where she mentioned the University of Arkansas’ program, which sparked my next journey. Even now seeing her dedication to students, alumni, her family and farm is admirable. Emily Buck continues to be the epitome of an excellent teacher, researcher, mentor and agriculturalist.

What is your favorite memory related to your time at Ohio State?
There are too many memories to list but I loved traveling across the country to the Sugar Bowl with my sorority sisters where we watched the Buckeyes take on the Hogs in New Orleans. Some other favorites were winning the Ed Johnson Outstanding Student Organization Award for Scarlet & Gray Ag Day at the college banquet and ultimately, graduating from The Ohio State University.

What was your first job following your education at Ohio State?
Upon graduation from Ohio State, I moved across the country to attend graduate school at the University of Arkansas. There I continued my education and career focus in agricultural communications.

For what schools, companies and/or organizations have you worked throughout your career?
I graduated with my Master’s degree and then spent the summer working at SRUC, an agricultural college in Edinburgh, Scotland. Later that Fall, I began my career at Field Agent, a mobile audit and insights business, in Fayetteville, Arkansas. At Field Agent, we give businesses a new way to gather information and insights from everyday shoppers. Through Field Agent’s mobile app, shoppers earn extra cash while helping out their favorite brands.

During your career, have you received any awards or honors? If so, what are those?
Golden Paper Towel Award for Service – Field Agent

Large, M. M., & Miller, J. D. (2013 February) The ELL: A Pathway to Real-World Experience. Southern region of the American Association for Agricultural Education: Orlando, Florida. Innovative Idea Poster 2nd place.

Student of the Fortnight – Ohio State

Top ranked freshmen FYE book essay in CFAES

As of today, what is your favorite career highlight?
This is more of an extracurricular, but I would have to say founding and becoming the president of The Ohio State University’s Northwest Arkansas Alumni Club. It has been so rewarding to bring together fellow Buckeyes in the heart of SEC country to have a sense of home and reminisce about our time at Ohio State.

What advice would you give to a current student?
My advice would be to take advantage of every opportunity that presents itself. Be a “yes” person. Really get to know your professors. Attend an event on Wednesday night even if you’re tired from a day of classes. Savor each and every moment because it all goes by way too fast. Most importantly, I’d like to tell every potential or current student I meet to study abroad. It can seem like a huge commitment both financially and time wise, but the benefits far outweigh the burdens.

What did ACEL cultivate in you? How?
When you see the word “cultivate,” you imagine a young seedling that turns into a vibrant flower and that is what ACEL did for me. The department helped a young seedling of a freshman by providing opportunities to grow and learn and by creating a place of community where I felt like I was a part of something bigger than myself. I was encouraged to give back to others and remember my roots. These experiences ultimately led to a flourishing graduate. I owe the best four years of my life to ACEL, CFAES and The Ohio State University. I am forever grateful.

 

 

 

 

Alumni Spotlight: Callie Wells, ’10, ’12 MS

[ACEL]: Hi Callie! Why did you select your major?
[Wells]:I had a hard time narrowing down a specific area to focus on for a few years into my undergraduate education. I couldn’t make my mind up because I wanted to learn it all! I had five, maybe more, combinations of majors and minors. After taking courses in nearly every discipline CFAES teaches, I became fascinated with learning about how people interact, learn, and communicate with each other. The ACEL disciplines were the perfect fit to marry my interests and talents in social sciences with my passion for the agriculture industry. I added agricultural education as a second major, in addition to animal science, in my undergraduate program and focused on agricultural communication in my graduate program.

Why did you choose to attend The Ohio State University?
Until halfway through my junior year of high school, I was sure I was going to Miami University, where my mom worked which provided me a full tuition waiver. Who’s going to pass up a full tuition waiver? Me, it turns out. I joined FFA my junior year and was involved in a lot of programs and CDE’s that provided me the opportunity to visit Ohio State. I was amazed at the vast opportunities at a university as large as Ohio State, but also at the tight knit community in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. Once I knew Ohio State was the place for me I worked hard to earn a few scholarships to soften the blow to my parents when I decided not to use the tuition waiver. A free education might be nice, but I knew in my gut Ohio State was the best place for me, and it is the best decision I have ever made!

How did your education at Ohio State influence your choice of career or your career path?
My education at Ohio State influenced my career path simply by giving me the best foundation of skills, experiences, and networks to build upon, and a passion to continue building it.

What were you involved in as an Ohio State student?
I was involved in so many student orgs! Ag Ed Society, Norton/Scott Hall Council, CFAES Student Council, Undergraduate Student Government, University Senate, CFAES Ambassadors, CFAES Banquet co-chair, SPHINX Senior Honorary, and many more. The experiences I had with these organizations is just as valuable as the time I spent in the classroom.

What classes did you enjoy the most while at Ohio State? Did you have a favorite?
I think my graduate school communication theory class was my favorite class during my time at Ohio State. Analyzing how various messaging impacts how individuals and groups think, act, and react… It’s hard to explain why, but it’s just an area I find endlessly fascinating.

What professor, faculty or staff member had an impact on your education/career? How?
There are so many who had a bit impact on me, and it is hard to choose, so I think I have to go with the person who had the first influential impact, and that would be Kelly Newlon. Seeing her passion for her work made me want to take the time to really figure out what my passion was and I might not have taken the time to figure it had I not seen it in her. She also led a study abroad program to the Czech Republic the summer after my freshman year that changed my life. I had never traveled in the States, let alone abroad, and Kelly was the perfect person to teach us about new cultures and help us process what we were learning.

What is your favorite memory related to your time at Ohio State?
One of my favorite memories is the day I was linked into SPHINX Senior Class Honorary. Each new class of Links is led by the current class on the long walk on the Oval while the Orton Hall Chimes play Carmen Ohio. It was a very special moment to reflect on how much I had experienced at Ohio State and how much was still to come.

What was your first job following your education at Ohio State?
My first job was as communications specialist at Ohio Farm Bureau.

For what schools, companies and/or organizations have you worked throughout your career?
I worked at Ohio Farm Bureau for five years, as communications specialist first and then as director of digital communications. I then moved on to be the marketing and production lead at Herdmark Media for a short time, and now am the communications specialist for the Ohio Association of School Business Officials. I’m also building a small side gig do freelance writing, digital communications/marketing consulting, and video production mostly for farms, smalls ag businesses, and associations.

As of today, what is your favorite career highlight?
I’m very proud to have started a few digital content strategies at Ohio Farm Bureau that give farmers a platform to tell their stories. Take Over Tuesday and Growing Our Generation were very simple ideas that have continued to grow long past my time running them, which I am very proud of.

What advice would you give to a current student?
Learn patience. Don’t rush things and take some time to get to know your talents and interests, while you are afforded the time to do so!

What did ACEL cultivate in you?
ACEL cultivated in me a passion for continual learning and community building.

 

 
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