Equity & Inclusion Blog Post

The Silent Majority

by a community member

At the start, I was going to write about a specific incident or two where individuals have shown an irrational fear of me and displayed acts of hatred due to my background. However, something clicked in my mind. My issues are not with the few individuals who expressed hatred and displayed racism toward me, but really with their silent peers. Reflecting back, in all of the incidents where I was forced to face hate, racism and bigotry, I was surrounded by the silent majority. In most of my unfortunate cases, members of the silent majority would pretend that they are suddenly deaf, blind or mute in the hopes that they do not have to intervene. As a result, it leaves individuals like me to our own fates in addressing this bigotry.

According to the United States Census Bureau, this silent majority constitutes 76.6% of the overall population of the United States of America[1]. Being part of this heavily represented population politically, socially and demographically places responsibilities on all members of the silent majority due to the fact that power on the political, social and communal levels resides with them. This means that the words and actions of the silent majority matter. They carry weight and have an audience that will listen and adjust their behavior accordingly. So the next time you see an act of hatred being displayed, ask yourself; if I do not intervene, who else will?

In the end, I would like to leave you all with this quote by Pastor Martin Niemöller’s, a former supporter of Nazi Germany and later one of its most outspoken adversaries[2], “First they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out—because I was not a socialist. Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak out— because I was not a trade unionist. Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—because I was not a Jew. Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.”

 

[1] “U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: UNITED STATES.” Census Bureau QuickFacts. Accessed March 21, 2019. https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/US/IPE120217.

[2] “MARTIN NIEMÖLLER: “FIRST THEY CAME FOR THE SOCIALISTS.” United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Accessed March 21, 2019. https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/article/martin-niemoeller-first-they-came-for-the-socialists.

**The Equity & Inclusion Committee posts blogs, articles, and other events in order to keep advisors engaged with tough topics of the day. Please feel free to comment below!**

Ice Skating Event- February 22

ACADAOS Ice Skating 

Join ACADAOS members for an evening of ice skating at the Ohio State Ice Rink! 

When? Friday, February 22nd, 5:40-8pm

Where? Ohio State Ice Rink, 390 Woody Hayes Drive 

RSVP here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/acadaos-ice-skating-tickets-55972945587

 

ACADOS will cover admission and skate rental for members (space is limited). Members are welcome to bring guests who will pay at the door. Please note that in order for us to cover members, we need to enter as a group. If you have to come late you are welcome to still join us, but would need to pay for your admission. 

Thanks to everyone who gave feedback about the best night to do this!

ACADAOS Workshop Series: Brainstorming Presentation Ideas

Tuesday, December 18th, members of ACADAOS met to brainstorm ideas for presentation proposals that could be submitted by advisors who were interested in presenting at various conferences. One of the biggest challenges with writing a proposal is actually coming up with an idea of what to present, so we thought we would share some of the ideas that were discussed (see below). Each participant shared wonderful ideas with the group and are open to presenting with others, which is why their contact information is listed next to the ideas. If you see a topic that interests you and you want to chat or are interested in presenting with the advisor listed, please feel free to reach out to them.

  • Jim Lingo (lingo.30@osu.edu)
    • Impostor syndrome as a young or newer professional
    • Jim is currently reading Peter Hagen’s book “The Power of Story: Narrative Theory in Academic Advising”, and he was interested in  presenting on the concept of narratives of advising
    • Managing larger caseloads, especially in offices of one or two
  • Amanda Crall (crall.25@osu.edu)
    • Establishing programs for graduate students
    • The structure of ACADAOS and the benefits of developing an advising organization on campus
    • Professional development
  • Jenna Russell (russell.1206@osu.edu)
    • Advising students in health majors
    • How to work with a competitive major and serve all populations of these students (those admitted to the program, those who need to find another major, etc.)
    • Preparing health majors for graduate level programs 
  • Caitlin Welsh (welsh.260@osu.edu)
    • Offering co-curricular opportunities (learning communities, etc.) that help students prepare for graduate/professional school
    • Also interested in presenting on working with competitive majors
  • Melissa Basford (basford.18@osu.edu)
    • helping students manage emotional reactions for competitive majors (Caitlin is interested in this too)
    • Panel idea for how to get started in advising
    • Transitioning from student affairs to academic advising
    • How to navigate career goals or adjusting in a higher education environment
    • How to start a recognition program on campus (staff/advisors, students, etc.)
      • Marketing to leadership to create buy-in
  • Stephanie Elliott (elliott.302@osu.edu)
    • Professional Development: identifying and connecting advisors w/PD opportunities on your campus without necessarily being experts on the topic
    • Panel across institutions regarding transitioning community college students to larger institutions
  • Katie Bush-Glenn (bush-glenn.1@osu.edu)
    • Retention
    • Peer mentoring/advising
    • Professional mentoring
  • General ideas if anyone is interested: 
    • Utilizing the Digital Flagship initiative in advising and/or survey (maybe a future topic once we have another year under our belts as a campus?)
    • Currently changing student demographics/personality (attention, reliant on specific forms of technology, need to go back to basics w/technology, etc.)
    • Different support systems established for students and encouraging them to take advantage of offerings (i.e. support from the start, FYE red/yellow/green light)

Moving forward, we will be hosting a second workshop focused on how to write proposals for submission and feedback, so keep an eye out for this offering in spring. Also, if there is a conference that you would like to present at, this is a good time to make note of proposal deadlines. Members of the ACADAOS Professional Development Committee are happy to assist you with the proposal feedback as well.

Disability Services 201: Identity and Inclusion Workshop

This is a friendly reminder that our November Workshop is Wednesday, November 14th at 3:30pm in Caldwell 133. At the event, we will be having a speaker from Student Life Disability Services (SLDS) available to answer your questions about SLDS services and discussing the following topics:

  • Disability as an aspect of diversity
  • Medical vs. social model of disability
  • Social identity/ableism
  • Portrayals of individuals with disabilities in the media
  • Discussion of bias and stereotypes
  • Accessibility tips and universal design principles
  • Etiquette tips

Please mark your calendars and let us know if you have any questions. For more information on upcoming events, please visit the ACADAOS website. Thanks, and hopefully we will see you next Wednesday!

ACADAOS Professional Development Committee

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